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Spawning sources, movement patterns, and nursery area replenishment of spawning populations of King George Whiting in south-eastern Australia — closing the life history loop

Jenkins, Gregory P., Hamer, Paul A., Kent, Julia A., Kemp, Jodie, Sherman, Craig and Fowler, Anthony J. 2016, Spawning sources, movement patterns, and nursery area replenishment of spawning populations of King George Whiting in south-eastern Australia — closing the life history loop, Fisheries Research and Development Corporation, Canberra, A.C.T..

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Title Spawning sources, movement patterns, and nursery area replenishment of spawning populations of King George Whiting in south-eastern Australia — closing the life history loop
Author(s) Jenkins, Gregory P.
Hamer, Paul A.
Kent, Julia A.
Kemp, Jodie
Sherman, CraigORCID iD for Sherman, Craig orcid.org/0000-0003-2099-0462
Fowler, Anthony J.
Publication date 2016-04-01
Total pages 119
Publisher Fisheries Research and Development Corporation
Place of publication Canberra, A.C.T.
Summary This was a collaborative project amongst scientists from the University of Melbourne, Fisheries Victoria, Deakin University and the South Australian Research and Development Institute. The project led to major advances in our understanding of the biology and population structure of King George Whiting in southern Australia. The project was able to demonstrate that Whiting in the Victorian and South Australian fisheries come from different spawning areas, and that adult Whiting from Victoria do notmigrate to the known Whiting spawning area in South Australia. The project also identified a previously unknown spawning area for King George Whiting in north-west Tasmania. King George Whiting in Tasmania (2 populations) and Western Australia were found to be genetically distinct from Whiting in Victoria and South Australia. The study, conducted over 4 years, was designed to determine whether single (State) jurisdictional management of the King George Whiting fishery was appropriate in relation to the population (stock) structure of the species. Innovative methods were used to determine population structure including otolith chemistry and advanced genetic analyses. The results support the current State (Jurisdictional) based management of the fisheries, however further work is recommended to completely clarify the relationship between the Victorian and South Australian King George Whiting populations.
ISBN 978 0 7340 5270 4
Language eng
Field of Research 060801 Animal Behaviour
060205 Marine and Estuarine Ecology (incl Marine Ichthyology)
Copyright notice ©2016, Fisheries Research and Development Corporation
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30103448

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.