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The renin-angiotensin system: a possible new target for depression

Vian, João, Pereira, Círia, Chavarria, Victor, Köhler, Cristiano, Stubbs, Brendon, Quevedo, João, Kim, Sung-Wan, Carvalho, André F., Berk, Michael and Simoes Fernandes, Brisa 2017, The renin-angiotensin system: a possible new target for depression, BMC Medicine, vol. 15, no. 1, pp. 144-156, doi: 10.1186/s12916-017-0916-3.

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Title The renin-angiotensin system: a possible new target for depression
Author(s) Vian, João
Pereira, Círia
Chavarria, Victor
Köhler, Cristiano
Stubbs, Brendon
Quevedo, João
Kim, Sung-Wan
Carvalho, André F.
Berk, MichaelORCID iD for Berk, Michael orcid.org/0000-0002-5554-6946
Simoes Fernandes, BrisaORCID iD for Simoes Fernandes, Brisa orcid.org/0000-0002-3797-7582
Journal name BMC Medicine
Volume number 15
Issue number 1
Start page 144
End page 156
Total pages 13
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2017-08-01
ISSN 1741-7015
1741-7015
Keyword(s) depression
psychiatry
inflammation
renin–angiotensin system
angiotensin
ATR1
ATR2
Mas
angiotensin receptor blockers
angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Medicine, General & Internal
General & Internal Medicine
QUALITY-OF-LIFE
CONVERTING-ENZYME GENE
ANXIETY-LIKE BEHAVIOR
CHRONIC MILD STRESS
INSULIN-REGULATED AMINOPEPTIDASE
SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE-RATS
REMITTED GERIATRIC DEPRESSION
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIAL
TYPE-2 RECEPTOR AGONIST
CENTRAL-NERVOUS-SYSTEM
Summary Depression remains a debilitating condition with an uncertain aetiology. Recently, attention has been given to the renin–angiotensin system. In the central nervous system, angiotensin II may be important in multiple pathways related to neurodevelopment and regulation of the stress response. Studies of drugs targeting the renin–angiotensin system have yielded promising results. Here, we review the potential beneficial effects of angiotensin blockers in depression and their mechanisms of action. Drugs blocking the angiotensin system have efficacy in several animal models of depression. While no randomised clinical trials were found, case reports and observational studies showed that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers had positive effects on depression, whereas other antihypertensive agents did not. Drugs targeting the renin–angiotensin system act on inflammatory pathways implicated in depression. Both preclinical and clinical data suggest that these drugs possess antidepressant properties. In light of these results, angiotensin system-blocking agents offer new horizons in mood disorder treatment.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12916-017-0916-3
Field of Research 11 Medical And Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30103533

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.