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The evolution of multiagency partnerships for safety over the course of research engagement: experiences from the NoGAPS project

Finch, Caroline F, Donaldson, Alex, Gabbe, Belinda J, Muhammad, Akram, Wong Shee, Annkarin, Lloyd, David G and Cook, Jill 2016, The evolution of multiagency partnerships for safety over the course of research engagement: experiences from the NoGAPS project, Injury prevention, vol. 22, no. 6, pp. 386-391, doi: 10.1136/injuryprev-2015-041922.

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Title The evolution of multiagency partnerships for safety over the course of research engagement: experiences from the NoGAPS project
Author(s) Finch, Caroline F
Donaldson, Alex
Gabbe, Belinda J
Muhammad, Akram
Wong Shee, AnnkarinORCID iD for Wong Shee, Annkarin orcid.org/0000-0001-5095-218X
Lloyd, David G
Cook, Jill
Journal name Injury prevention
Volume number 22
Issue number 6
Start page 386
End page 391
Total pages 6
Publisher BMJ Publishing Group
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2016-12
ISSN 1353-8047
1475-5785
Keyword(s) multiagency partnerships
NoGAPS project
research
injury prevention
population-level
government health promotion
safety agencies
Summary Objective Implementation of effective population-level injury prevention interventions requires broad multiagency partnerships. Different stakeholders address this from varying perspectives, and potential conflicts in priorities need to be addressed for such partnerships to be effective. The researcher-led National Guidance for Australian football Partnerships and Safety (NoGAPS) project involved the engagement and participation of seven non-academic partners, including government health promotion and safety agencies; peak sports professional and advocacy bodies and health insurance organisations.

Design The partnership's ongoing development was assessed by each partner completing the Victorian Health Promotion Foundation Partnership Analysis Tool (VPAT) annually over 2011–2015. Changes in VPAT scores were compared through repeated measures analysis of variance.

Results Overall, mean total VPAT scores increased significantly over the 5-year period (125.1–141.2; F5,30=4.61, p=0.003), showing a significant improvement in how the partnership was functioning over time. This was largely driven by significant increases in several VPAT domains: ‘determining the need for a partnership’ (F5,30=4.15, p=0.006), ‘making sure the partnership works’ (F5,30=2.59, p=0.046), ‘planning collaborative action’ (F5,30=5.13, p=0.002) and ‘minimising the barriers to the partnership’ (F5,30=6.66, p<0.001).

Conclusion This is the first study to assess the functioning of a multiagency partnership to address sport injury prevention implementation. For NoGAPS, the engagement of stakeholders from the outset facilitated the development of new and/or stronger links between non-academic partners. Partners shared the common goal of ensuring the real-world uptake of interventions and research evidence-informed recommendations. Effective multiagency partnerships have the potential to influence the implementation of policies and practices beyond the life of a research project.
Language eng
DOI 10.1136/injuryprev-2015-041922
Field of Research 1117 Public Health And Health Services
1701 Psychology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2016, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution non-commercial licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30103599

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Medicine
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.