Openly accessible

Prey selection and dietary flexibility of three species of mammalian predator during an irruption of non-cyclic prey

Spencer, Emma E., Newsome, Thomas and Dickman, Christopher R. 2017, Prey selection and dietary flexibility of three species of mammalian predator during an irruption of non-cyclic prey, Royal Society open science, vol. 4, no. 9, pp. 1-11, doi: 10.1098/rsos.170317.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
newsome-preyselection-2017.pdf Published version application/pdf 682.31KB 2

Title Prey selection and dietary flexibility of three species of mammalian predator during an irruption of non-cyclic prey
Author(s) Spencer, Emma E.
Newsome, ThomasORCID iD for Newsome, Thomas orcid.org/0000-0003-3457-3256
Dickman, Christopher R.
Journal name Royal Society open science
Volume number 4
Issue number 9
Article ID 170317
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher Royal Society Publishing
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2017-09
ISSN 2054-5703
Keyword(s) dietary shifts
dingo
feral cat
prey irruptions
prey selection
red fox
Summary Predators often display dietary shifts in response to fluctuating prey in cyclic systems, but little is known about predator diets in systems that experience non-cyclic prey irruptions. We tracked dietary shifts by feral cats (Felis catus), red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and dingoes (Canis dingo) through a non-cyclic irruption of small mammalian prey in the Simpson Desert, central Australia. We predicted that all three predators would alter their diets to varying degrees as small mammals declined post irruption, and to test our predictions we live-trapped small mammals through the irruption event and collected scats to track predator diets. Red foxes and dingoes included a broader variety of prey in their diets as small mammals declined. Feral cats did not exhibit a similar dietary shift, but did show variable use and selectivity of small mammal species through the irruption cycle. Results were largely consistent with prior studies that highlighted the opportunistic feeding habits of the red fox and dingo. They also, however, showed that feral cats may exhibit less dietary flexibility in response to small mammal irruptions, emphasizing the importance of tracking predator diets before, during and after irruption events.
Language eng
DOI 10.1098/rsos.170317
Field of Research 060806 Animal Physiological Ecology
050211 Wildlife and Habitat Management
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30103834

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 1 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 2 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 30 Abstract Views, 3 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 27 Oct 2017, 17:55:59 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.