You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

Cohort profile: workers' compensation in a changing Australian labour market: the return to work (RTW) study

Dimitriadis, Christina, LaMontagne, Anthony D, Lilley, Rebbecca, Hogg-Johnson, Sheilah, Sim, Malcolm and Smith, Peter 2017, Cohort profile: workers' compensation in a changing Australian labour market: the return to work (RTW) study, BMJ open, vol. 7, no. 11, pp. 1-9, doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-016366.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
lamontagne-cohortprofileworkers-2017.pdf Published version application/pdf 556.36KB 2

Title Cohort profile: workers' compensation in a changing Australian labour market: the return to work (RTW) study
Author(s) Dimitriadis, Christina
LaMontagne, Anthony DORCID iD for LaMontagne, Anthony D orcid.org/0000-0002-5811-5906
Lilley, Rebbecca
Hogg-Johnson, Sheilah
Sim, Malcolm
Smith, Peter
Journal name BMJ open
Volume number 7
Issue number 11
Article ID e016366
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher BMJ Publishing Group
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2017-11-08
ISSN 2044-6055
Keyword(s) longitudinal
musculoskeletal injury
older workers
psychological injury
return to work
science & technology
life sciences & biomedicine
medicine, general & internal
general & internal medicine
Summary PURPOSE: Workers' compensation claims for older workers and workers who have suffered psychological injury are increasing as a proportion of total claims in many jurisdictions. In the Australian state of Victoria, claims from both these groups are associated with higher than average wage replacement and healthcare expenditures. This cohort profile describes a longitudinal study which aims to investigate differences in the return to work (RTW) process for older workers compared with younger workers and claimants with musculoskeletal injuries compared with those with psychological injuries.

PARTICIPANTS: This prospective cohort study involved interviewing workers' compensation claimants at three time points. The cohort was restricted to psychological and musculoskeletal claims. Only claimants aged 18 and over were recruited, with no upper age limit. A total of 869 claimants completed the baseline interview, representing 36% of the eligible claimant population. Ninety-one per cent of participants agreed at baseline to have their survey responses linked to administrative workers' compensation data. Of the 869 claimants who participated at baseline, 632 (73%) took part in the 6-month follow-up interview, and 572 (66%) participated in the 12-month follow-up interview.

FINDINGS TO DATE: Information on different aspects of the RTW process and important factors that may impact the RTW process was collected at the three survey periods. At baseline, participants and non-participants did not differ by injury type or age group, but were more likely to be female and from the healthcare and social assistance industry. The probability of non-participation at follow-up interviews showed younger age was a statistically significant predictor of non-participation.

FUTURE PLANS: Analysis of the longitudinal cohort will identify important factors in the RTW process and explore differences across age and injury type groups. Ongoing linkage to administrative workers' compensation data will provide information on wage replacement and healthcare service use into the future.
Language eng
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-016366
Field of Research 111705 Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety
Socio Economic Objective 920409 Injury Control
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution non-commercial licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30104856

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Health and Social Development
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 26 Abstract Views, 4 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Wed, 15 Nov 2017, 15:13:29 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.