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Rising temperatures may drive fishing-induced selection of low-performance phenotypes

Clark, Timothy D., Messmer, Vanessa, Tobin, Andrew J., Hoey, Andrew S. and Pratchett, Morgan S. 2017, Rising temperatures may drive fishing-induced selection of low-performance phenotypes, Scientific reports, vol. 7, pp. 1-11, doi: 10.1038/srep40571.

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Title Rising temperatures may drive fishing-induced selection of low-performance phenotypes
Author(s) Clark, Timothy D.
Messmer, Vanessa
Tobin, Andrew J.
Hoey, Andrew S.
Pratchett, Morgan S.
Journal name Scientific reports
Volume number 7
Article ID 40571
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher Nature
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2017-01-17
ISSN 2045-2322
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Multidisciplinary Sciences
Science & Technology - Other Topics
GREAT-BARRIER-REEF
FISHERIES-INDUCED EVOLUTION
WESTERN NORTH-ATLANTIC
PELAGIC LONGLINE GEAR
CLIMATE-CHANGE
RECREATIONAL FISHERY
PERSONALITY-TRAITS
ACTIVITY PATTERNS
MARINE FISHES
SPACE USE
Summary Climate warming is likely to interact with other stressors to challenge the physiological capacities and survival of phenotypes within populations. This may be especially true for the billions of fishes per year that undergo vigorous exercise prior to escaping or being intentionally released from fishing gear. Using adult coral grouper (Plectropomus leopardus), an important fisheries species throughout the Indo-Pacific, we show that population-level survival following vigorous exercise is increasingly compromised as temperatures increase from current-day levels (100-67% survival at 24-30 °C) to those projected for the end of the century (42% survival at 33 °C). Intriguingly, we demonstrate that high-performance individuals take longer to recover to a resting metabolic state and subsequently have lower survival in warm water compared with conspecifics that exercise less vigorously. Moreover, we show that post-exercise mortality of high-performance phenotypes manifests after 3-13 d at the current summer maximum (30 °C), while mortality at 33 °C occurs within 1.8-14.9 h. We propose that wild populations in a warming climate may become skewed towards low-performance phenotypes with ramifications for predator-prey interactions and community dynamics. Our findings highlight the susceptibility of phenotypic diversity to fishing activities and demonstrate a mechanism that may contribute to fishing-induced evolution in the face of ongoing climate change.
Language eng
DOI 10.1038/srep40571
Field of Research 070403 Fisheries Management
070499 Fisheries Sciences not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30104988

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.