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Hypoxia tolerance is conserved across genetically distinct sub-populations of an iconic, tropical Australian teleost (Lates calcarifer)

Collins, Geoffrey M., Clark, Timothy D., Rummer, Jodie L. and Carton, Alexander G. 2013, Hypoxia tolerance is conserved across genetically distinct sub-populations of an iconic, tropical Australian teleost (Lates calcarifer), Conservation physiology, vol. 1, no. 1, pp. 1-9, doi: 10.1093/conphys/cot029.

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Title Hypoxia tolerance is conserved across genetically distinct sub-populations of an iconic, tropical Australian teleost (Lates calcarifer)
Formatted title Hypoxia tolerance is conserved across genetically distinct sub-populations of an iconic, tropical Australian teleost (Lates calcarifer)
Author(s) Collins, Geoffrey M.
Clark, Timothy D.
Rummer, Jodie L.
Carton, Alexander G.
Journal name Conservation physiology
Volume number 1
Issue number 1
Article ID cot029
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Publisher Oxford University Press
Place of publication Oxford, Eng.
Publication date 2013
ISSN 2051-1434
Keyword(s) Barramundi
Lates calcarifer
climate change
critical oxygen saturation hypoxia
tropical
Summary Tropical coastal systems are particularly prone to periods of environmental hypoxia, which can result from organismal respiration as well as thermal stratification, and may be further exacerbated by anthropogenic disturbances. In this study, we used five genetically distinct sub-populations of Australian barramundi (Lates calcarifer) to examine the extent of intraspecific variability in hypoxia tolerance. Fish were maintained at two temperatures (26 or 36°C), representing the seasonal thermal range for this species across its tropical distribution in Australia. All fish maintained a constant oxygen consumption rate ( ) O2M as air saturation of the water decreased from 100% down to a critical oxygen saturation ([O2]crit) of 15.44 ± 3.20 and 21.07 ± 3.92% (means ± SD) at 26 and 36°C, respectively. Mean [O2]crit, used as a performance measure of hypoxia tolerance, did not differ between sub-populations. No differences were found for resting M O2 between sub-populations at 26°C,
but modest differences were detected between two sub-populations at 36°C (3.36 ± 0.62 and 2.83 ± 0.27 mg O2 kg−1 min−1 for Gladstone and Broome sub-populations, respectively). Resting M O2 was lower for sub-populations at 26°C (1.46 ± 0.26 mg
O2 kg−1 min−1) than at 36°C (3.10 ± 0.43 mg O2 kg−1 min−1), with a temperature coefficient (Q10) of 2.12 ± 0.30. We conclude that both hypoxia tolerance and resting M
O2 are conserved across the distribution of barramundi in Australia, which reflects
the capacity of this species to cope in environments with large fluctuations in both temperature and dissolved oxygen.
Language eng
DOI 10.1093/conphys/cot029
Field of Research 070405 Fish Physiology and Genetics
070499 Fisheries Sciences not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2013, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30105092

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.