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A synthesis of tagging studies examining the behaviour and survival of anadromous salmonids in marine environments

Drenner, S. Matthew, Clark, Timothy D., Whitney, Charlotte K., Martins, Eduardo G., Cooke, Steven J. and Hinch, Scott G. 2012, A synthesis of tagging studies examining the behaviour and survival of anadromous salmonids in marine environments, PLoS one, vol. 7, no. 3, pp. 1-13, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0031311.

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Title A synthesis of tagging studies examining the behaviour and survival of anadromous salmonids in marine environments
Author(s) Drenner, S. Matthew
Clark, Timothy D.
Whitney, Charlotte K.
Martins, Eduardo G.
Cooke, Steven J.
Hinch, Scott G.
Journal name PLoS one
Volume number 7
Issue number 3
Article ID e31311
Start page 1
End page 13
Total pages 13
Publisher PLoS
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2012
ISSN 1932-6203
Keyword(s) Animals
Behavior, Animal
Ecosystem
Ethology
Salmonidae
Seawater
Species Specificity
Survival Analysis
Summary This paper synthesizes tagging studies to highlight the current state of knowledge concerning the behaviour and survival of anadromous salmonids in the marine environment. Scientific literature was reviewed to quantify the number and type of studies that have investigated behaviour and survival of anadromous forms of Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.), Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), brown trout (Salmo trutta), steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), and cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii). We examined three categories of tags including electronic (e.g. acoustic, radio, archival), passive (e.g. external marks, Carlin, coded wire, passive integrated transponder [PIT]), and biological (e.g. otolith, genetic, scale, parasites). Based on 207 papers, survival rates and behaviour in marine environments were found to be extremely variable spatially and temporally, with some of the most influential factors being temperature, population, physiological state, and fish size. Salmonids at all life stages were consistently found to swim at an average speed of approximately one body length per second, which likely corresponds with the speed at which transport costs are minimal. We found that there is relatively little research conducted on open-ocean migrating salmonids, and some species (e.g. masu [O. masou] and amago [O. rhodurus]) are underrepresented in the literature. The most common forms of tagging used across life stages were various forms of external tags, coded wire tags, and acoustic tags, however, the majority of studies did not measure tagging/handling effects on the fish, tag loss/failure, or tag detection probabilities when estimating survival. Through the interdisciplinary application of existing and novel technologies, future research examining the behaviour and survival of anadromous salmonids could incorporate important drivers such as oceanography, tagging/handling effects, predation, and physiology.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0031311
Field of Research 060801 Animal Behaviour
070401 Aquaculture
MD Multidisciplinary
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2012, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30105097

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.