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Consequences of high temperatures and premature mortality on the transcriptome and blood physiology of wild adult sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka)

Jeffries, Ken M., Hinch, Scott G., Sierocinski, Thomas, Clark, Timothy D., Eliason, Erika J., Donaldson, Michael R., Li, Shaorong, Pavlidis, Paul and Miller, Kristi M. 2012, Consequences of high temperatures and premature mortality on the transcriptome and blood physiology of wild adult sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), Ecology and evolution, vol. 2, no. 7, pp. 1747-1764, doi: 10.1002/ece3.274.

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Title Consequences of high temperatures and premature mortality on the transcriptome and blood physiology of wild adult sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka)
Formatted title Consequences of high temperatures and premature mortality on the transcriptome and blood physiology of wild adult sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka)
Author(s) Jeffries, Ken M.
Hinch, Scott G.
Sierocinski, Thomas
Clark, Timothy D.
Eliason, Erika J.
Donaldson, Michael R.
Li, Shaorong
Pavlidis, Paul
Miller, Kristi M.
Journal name Ecology and evolution
Volume number 2
Issue number 7
Start page 1747
End page 1764
Total pages 18
Publisher John Wiley & Sons
Place of publication Chichester, Eng.
Publication date 2012-07
ISSN 2045-7758
Keyword(s) Ecological genomics
Pacific salmon
premature mortality
spawning migration
stress
temperature
Summary Elevated river water temperature in the Fraser River, British Columbia, Canada, has
been associated with enhanced mortality of adult sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus
nerka) during their upriver migration to spawning grounds.We undertook a study
to assess the effects of elevated water temperatures on the gill transcriptome and
blood plasma variables in wild-caught sockeye salmon. Naturally migrating sockeye
salmon returning to the Fraser River were collected and held at ecologically
relevant temperatures of 14◦C and 19◦C for seven days, a period representing a
significant portion of their upstream migration. After seven days, sockeye salmon
held at 19◦C stimulated heat shock response genes as well as many genes associated with an immune response when compared with fish held at 14◦C. Additionally, fish at 19◦C had elevated plasma chloride and lactate, suggestive of a disturbance in osmoregulatory homeostasis and a stress response detectable in the blood plasma. Fish that died prematurely over the course of the holding study were compared with time-matched surviving fish; the former fish were characterized by an upregulation of several transcription factors associated with apoptosis and downregulation of genes involved in immune function and antioxidant activity. Ornithine decarboxylase(ODC1) was the most significantly upregulated gene in dying salmon, which suggests an association with cellular apoptosis. We hypothesize that the observed decrease in plasma ions and increases in plasma cortisol that occur in dying fish may be linked to the increase in ODC1. By highlighting these underlying
physiological mechanisms, this study enhances our understanding of the processes
involved in premature mortality and temperature stress in Pacific salmon during
migration to spawning grounds.
Language eng
DOI 10.1002/ece3.274
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2012, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30105098

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.