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Physiological benefits of being small in a changing world: responses of Coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) to an acute thermal challenge and a simulated capture event

Clark, Timothy D., Donaldson, Michael R., Pieperhoff, Sebastian, Drenner, S. Matthew, Lotto, Andrew, Cooke, Steven J., Hinch, Scott G., Patterson, David A. and Farrell, Anthony P. 2012, Physiological benefits of being small in a changing world: responses of Coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) to an acute thermal challenge and a simulated capture event, PLoS one, vol. 7, no. 6, pp. 1-8, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0039079.

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Title Physiological benefits of being small in a changing world: responses of Coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) to an acute thermal challenge and a simulated capture event
Formatted title Physiological benefits of being small in a changing world: responses of Coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) to an acute thermal challenge and a simulated capture event
Author(s) Clark, Timothy D.ORCID iD for Clark, Timothy D. orcid.org/0000-0001-8738-3347
Donaldson, Michael R.
Pieperhoff, Sebastian
Drenner, S. Matthew
Lotto, Andrew
Cooke, Steven J.
Hinch, Scott G.
Patterson, David A.
Farrell, Anthony P.
Journal name PLoS one
Volume number 7
Issue number 6
Article ID e39079
Start page 1
End page 8
Total pages 8
Publisher Public Library of Science
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2012-06
ISSN 1932-6203
Keyword(s) Animals
Body Weight
Female
Male
Oncorhynchus kisutch
Oxygen Consumption
Temperature
Science & Technology
Multidisciplinary Sciences
Science & Technology - Other Topics
CLIMATE-CHANGE
PACIFIC SALMON
MARINE FISHES
EXHAUSTIVE EXERCISE
OXYGEN-CONSUMPTION
NORTH PACIFIC
FRASER-RIVER
BODY-MASS
ION LOSS
Summary Evidence is building to suggest that both chronic and acute warm temperature exposure, as well as other anthropogenic perturbations, may select for small adult fish within a species. To shed light on this phenomenon, we investigated physiological and anatomical attributes associated with size-specific responses to an acute thermal challenge and a fisheries capture simulation (exercise+air exposure) in maturing male coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). Full-size females were included for a sex-specific comparison. A size-specific response in haematology to an acute thermal challenge (from 7 to 20 °C at 3 °C h(-1)) was apparent only for plasma potassium, whereby full-size males exhibited a significant increase in comparison with smaller males ('jacks'). Full-size females exhibited an elevated blood stress response in comparison with full-size males. Metabolic recovery following exhaustive exercise at 7 °C was size-specific, with jacks regaining resting levels of metabolism at 9.3 ± 0.5 h post-exercise in comparison with 12.3 ± 0.4 h for full-size fish of both sexes. Excess post-exercise oxygen consumption scaled with body mass in male fish with an exponent of b = 1.20 ± 0.08. Jacks appeared to regain osmoregulatory homeostasis faster than full-size males, and they had higher ventilation rates at 1 h post-exercise. Peak metabolic rate during post-exercise recovery scaled with body mass with an exponent of b~1, suggesting that the slower metabolic recovery in large fish was not due to limitations in diffusive or convective oxygen transport, but that large fish simply accumulated a greater 'oxygen debt' that took longer to pay back at the size-independent peak metabolic rate of ~6 mg min(-1) kg(-1). Post-exercise recovery of plasma testosterone was faster in jacks compared with full-size males, suggesting less impairment of the maturation trajectory of smaller fish. Supporting previous studies, these findings suggest that environmental change and non-lethal fisheries interactions have the potential to select for small individuals within fish populations over time.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0039079
Field of Research 060801 Animal Behaviour
070499 Fisheries Sciences not elsewhere classified
MD Multidisciplinary
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2012, Clark et al.
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30105099

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.