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Using non-invasive transcranial stimulation to improve motor and cognitive function in Parkinson's disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Goodwill, Alicia M, Lum, Jarrad AG, Hendy, Ashlee M, Muthalib, Makii, Johnson, Liam, Albein-Urios, Natalia and Teo, Wei-Peng 2017, Using non-invasive transcranial stimulation to improve motor and cognitive function in Parkinson's disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis, Scientific reports, vol. 7, no. 1, pp. 1-11, doi: 10.1038/s41598-017-13260-z.

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Title Using non-invasive transcranial stimulation to improve motor and cognitive function in Parkinson's disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis
Author(s) Goodwill, Alicia M
Lum, Jarrad AGORCID iD for Lum, Jarrad AG orcid.org/0000-0003-2098-2403
Hendy, Ashlee M
Muthalib, Makii
Johnson, Liam
Albein-Urios, NataliaORCID iD for Albein-Urios, Natalia orcid.org/0000-0001-7841-018X
Teo, Wei-PengORCID iD for Teo, Wei-Peng orcid.org/0000-0003-3929-9778
Journal name Scientific reports
Volume number 7
Issue number 1
Article ID 14840
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2017-11-01
ISSN 2045-2322
2045-2322
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Multidisciplinary Sciences
Science & Technology - Other Topics
HIGH-FREQUENCY RTMS
MAGNETIC STIMULATION
CORTICAL EXCITABILITY
BRAIN-STIMULATION
INDUCED DYSKINESIAS
PREFRONTAL CORTEX
INCIDENT DEMENTIA
DOUBLE-BLIND
AREA
PERFORMANCE
Summary Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder affecting motor and cognitive abilities. There is no cure for PD, therefore identifying safe therapies to alleviate symptoms remains a priority. This meta-analysis quantified the effectiveness of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and transcranial electrical stimulation (TES) to improve motor and cognitive dysfunction in PD. PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, Google Scholar, Scopus, Library of Congress and Cochrane library were searched. 24 rTMS and 9 TES studies (n = 33) with a sham control group were included for analyses. The Physiotherapy Evidence Database and Cochrane Risk of Bias showed high quality (7.5/10) and low bias with included studies respectively. Our results showed an overall positive effect in favour of rTMS (SMD = 0.394, CI [0.106–0.683], p = 0.007) and TES (SMD = 0.611, CI [0.188–1.035], p = 0.005) compared with sham stimulation on motor function, with no significant differences detected between rTMS and TES (Q [1] = 0.69, p = 0.406). Neither rTMS nor TES improved cognition. No effects for stimulation parameters on motor or cognitive function were observed. To enhance the clinical utility of non-invasive brain stimulation (NBS), individual prescription of stimulation parameters based upon symptomology and resting excitability state should be a priority of future research.
Language eng
DOI 10.1038/s41598-017-13260-z
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30105110

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.