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Using the diamond dialogue to explore community ambivalence towards changing alcohol use and strengthen community action

James, Sandi, Eckermann, Elizabeth, Shoesmith, Wendy, Lasimbang, Helen and Joseph, Asong 2017, Using the diamond dialogue to explore community ambivalence towards changing alcohol use and strengthen community action, Journal of Addiction Research & Therapy, vol. 8, no. 4, pp. 27-27, doi: 10.4172/2155-6105-C1-030.

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Title Using the diamond dialogue to explore community ambivalence towards changing alcohol use and strengthen community action
Author(s) James, Sandi
Eckermann, ElizabethORCID iD for Eckermann, Elizabeth orcid.org/0000-0002-4908-5629
Shoesmith, Wendy
Lasimbang, Helen
Joseph, Asong
Journal name Journal of Addiction Research & Therapy
Volume number 8
Issue number 4
Start page 27
End page 27
Total pages 1
Publisher Omics Publishing Group
Place of publication Los Angeles, Calif.
Publication date 2017
ISSN 2155-6105
Summary Statement of the Problem: Alcohol related harm is considered significant in many areas in Sabah. This project aimed to provide community members with information and approaches to addressing this problem in their own area. This paper shows a unique approach to health promotion and community engagement in rural communities.

Method: This project used action research methodology. A workshop for alcohol misuse was held in a rural village. At the start of the workshop four groups were formed and focus group discussions were held using the diamond dialogue technique. Responses were analysed for themes, using grounded theory methods. The position on the diamond shape was analysed by overlaying a 11 point grid, with 10 corresponding to the highest level of happiness and 0 corresponding to the lowest level of happiness.

Results & Findings:
The diamond dialogue was originally created as a research tool to measure the effectiveness of community level interventions on wellbeing. This tool was initially used as a way of evaluating our alcohol intervention. While being used in this way it was noted that the tool itself provided an avenue for change. It has not previously been used specifically as an intervention in itself. The respondents appeared to understand the exercise well. Five main themes were found: Family and relationships, security, health, expanding horizons, religion. Alcohol was a topic that pervaded all of these themes, with positive and negative effects. Results suggest that using the diamond dialogue created a collective motivation to change. Exploring community ambivalence towards alcohol, acceptance of both the positive and negative effects and validation of the community’s views provided a platform for engagement. This leads to “change talk” and ownership of possible solutions.

Conclusion & Significance:
This research suggests the diamond dialogue tool is useful both as an explorative tool and a standalone community level intervention tool. Further research is underway to further explore this conclusion and develop the tool for wider use in communities.
Language eng
DOI 10.4172/2155-6105-C1-030
Field of Research 160801 Applied Sociology, Program Evaluation and Social Impact Assessment
Socio Economic Objective 920413 Social Structure and Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30105173

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.