Openly accessible

Counterfactual communities: strategy games, paratexts and the player’s experience of history

Apperley, Tom 2018, Counterfactual communities: strategy games, paratexts and the player’s experience of history, Open library of humanities, vol. 4, pp. 1-22, doi: 10.16995/olh.286.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
apperley-counterfactual-2018.pdf Published version application/pdf 389.17KB 7

Title Counterfactual communities: strategy games, paratexts and the player’s experience of history
Author(s) Apperley, Tom
Journal name Open library of humanities
Volume number 4
Article ID 15
Start page 1
End page 22
Total pages 22
Publisher Open Library of the Humanities
Place of publication Cambridge, Eng.
Publication date 2018-03-23
ISSN 2056-6700
Summary The genre of history strategy games is a crucial area of study because of what is at stake in the representation of controversial aspects of history in popular culture. Previous work has pointed to various affordances and constraints in the representation of history, based on the framing of the game interface, the alignment of goals with certain strategies and textual criticism of the contents of the games. In contrast, this article examines these games from the perspective of the player’s experience of play in relation to a wider gaming community. It is in these counterfactual communities that players negotiate their individual experience with their knowledge of the history that is presented in the games that they play, indicating that the relationship between digital games, players and history is highly contextual. The relevant practices of players of history strategy games are illustrated with examples from the official and unofficial communities of the Paradox Interactive games Europa Universalis II and Victoria: Empire Under the Sun. The shared paratexts demonstrate how positions are negotiated in relation to the ‘official’ version of history presented in the games. These negotiations are made tangible through the production and sharing of paratexts that remix the official history of the games to include other perspectives developed through counterfactual imaginations. These findings indicate the importance of including perspectives from gaming communities to support other forms of analysis in order to make rigorous observations about the impact of digital games on popular history.
Language eng
DOI 10.16995/olh.286
Field of Research 130201 Creative Arts, Media and Communication Curriculum and Pedagogy
Socio Economic Objective 930201 Pedagogy
HERDC Research category C2 Other contribution to refereed journal
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30105198

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Education
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 13 Abstract Views, 8 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 30 Nov 2017, 07:26:57 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.