You are not logged in.
Openly accessible

Human-non-human: the speculative robot

Keane, Jondi and Anderson, Charles 2017, Human-non-human: the speculative robot, Transformations: Journal of Media, Culture & Technology, no. 29, pp. 69-87.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
keane-humannonhuman-2017.pdf Published version application/pdf 476.96KB 3

Title Human-non-human: the speculative robot
Author(s) Keane, JondiORCID iD for Keane, Jondi orcid.org/0000-0002-6553-3313
Anderson, Charles
Journal name Transformations: Journal of Media, Culture & Technology
Issue number 29
Start page 69
End page 87
Total pages 18
Publisher Central Queensland University * Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Education
Place of publication Lismore, NSW
Publication date 2017
ISSN 1444-3775
Keyword(s) robotic art
flat ontology
speculative design
creative collaboration
distributed cognition
feedback systems
procedural drawing
Summary In this paper we explore and unpack the implications and issues arising from our exhibition project Technics and Touch: Body-Matter-Machine, which tested the limits of human and robot proficiencies through a series of experimental scenarios. The project explored methods of producing feedback systems through perception and action cycles. The exhibition consisted of two parallel events: a laboratory space where the artists were “in-residence,” producing drawings in conjunction with the robot; and a procedural drawing exhibition in an adjoining space, where the outcomes of this human/nonhuman team were exhibited alongside the work of practitioners who have been exploring rule-based drawing for some time. The aim was to make and to discuss approaches to embodied, expanded and autonomous intelligent systems. Towards that end, we worked to articulate a range of ideas that emerged from the project: the expanded space of the robot, which includes a complex human-non-human set of relationships that imprint upon the newly created network of the human-non-human (a better if more cumbersome word for the expanded space we currently call “robot”) and, the notion that this expanded space of the “robot” introduces a set of response parameters that were not aimed at duplication or fabrication but at exceeding the critical frameworks that filter and reduce what counts as “real.” This makes the robot-system, Ela, a speculative robot, one that is thoroughly embedded in this process of co-creation.
Language eng
Field of Research 190103 Art Theory
MD Multidisciplinary
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30105263

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 28 Abstract Views, 5 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 04 Dec 2017, 10:48:07 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.