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Influence of sequential vs. simultaneous dual-task exercise training on cognitive function in older adults

Tait, Jamie L., Duckham, Rachel L., Milte, Catherine M., Main, Luana C. and Daly, Robin M. 2017, Influence of sequential vs. simultaneous dual-task exercise training on cognitive function in older adults, Frontiers in aging neuroscience, vol. 9, pp. 1-10, doi: 10.3389/fnagi.2017.00368.

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Title Influence of sequential vs. simultaneous dual-task exercise training on cognitive function in older adults
Author(s) Tait, Jamie L.
Duckham, Rachel L.ORCID iD for Duckham, Rachel L. orcid.org/0000-0001-7882-2950
Milte, Catherine M.ORCID iD for Milte, Catherine M. orcid.org/0000-0003-0035-6405
Main, Luana C.ORCID iD for Main, Luana C. orcid.org/0000-0002-9576-9466
Daly, Robin M.ORCID iD for Daly, Robin M. orcid.org/0000-0002-9897-1598
Journal name Frontiers in aging neuroscience
Volume number 9
Article ID 368
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher Frontiers Media
Place of publication Lausanne, Switzerland
Publication date 2017-11
ISSN 1663-4365
Keyword(s) aging
cognition
dual-task training
older adults
physical activity
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Geriatrics & Gerontology
Neurosciences
Neurosciences & Neurology
RANDOMIZED-CONTROLLED-TRIAL
PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY
SYNAPTIC PLASTICITY
FOLLOW-UP
BRAIN
IMPAIRMENT
IMPROVES
DEMENTIA
RISK
INTERVENTION
Summary Emerging research indicates that exercise combined with cognitive training may improve cognitive function in older adults. Typically these programs have incorporated sequential training, where exercise and cognitive training are undertaken separately. However, simultaneous or dual-task training, where cognitive and/or motor training are performed simultaneously with exercise, may offer greater benefits. This review summary provides an overview of the effects of combined simultaneous vs. sequential training on cognitive function in older adults. Based on the available evidence, there are inconsistent findings with regard to the cognitive benefits of sequential training in comparison to cognitive or exercise training alone. In contrast, simultaneous training interventions, particularly multimodal exercise programs in combination with secondary tasks regulated by sensory cues, have significantly improved cognition in both healthy older and clinical populations. However, further research is needed to determine the optimal characteristics of a successful simultaneous training program for optimizing cognitive function in older people.
Language eng
DOI 10.3389/fnagi.2017.00368
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C2 Other contribution to refereed journal
Copyright notice ©2017, Tait, Duckham, Milte, Main and Daly.
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30105313

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.