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Ethnic variability in Glycemic response to sucrose and isomaltulose

Tan, Kimberly Wei Shuan, Tan, Sze-Yen and Henry, Christiani Jeyakumar 2017, Ethnic variability in Glycemic response to sucrose and isomaltulose, Nutrients, vol. 9, no. 4, pp. 1-7, doi: 10.3390/nu9040347.

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Title Ethnic variability in Glycemic response to sucrose and isomaltulose
Author(s) Tan, Kimberly Wei Shuan
Tan, Sze-Yen
Henry, Christiani Jeyakumar
Journal name Nutrients
Volume number 9
Issue number 4
Article ID 347
Start page 1
End page 7
Total pages 7
Publisher M D P I AG
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2017-04-01
ISSN 2072-6643
Keyword(s) ethnic differences
glycemic response
isomaltulose
sucrose
Adult
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Beverages
Blood Glucose
Cross-Over Studies
Dietary Sucrose
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Glucose Intolerance
Glycemic Index
Humans
Hyperglycemia
Isomaltose
Malaysia
Male
Nutritive Sweeteners
Postprandial Period
Risk
Singapore
Young Adult
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Nutrition & Dietetics
POSTPRANDIAL HYPERGLYCEMIA
CARDIOVASCULAR-DISEASE
INDEX
COMPLICATIONS
ASSOCIATION
VALUES
ASIANS
ADULTS
TIME
Summary The aim of this study was to compare the glycemic response of Caucasians and Asians to two disaccharides of different glycemic index (GI), and to examine if ethnic groups that showed the largest glycemic response to sucrose would benefit the most when it is replaced with isomaltulose. Forty healthy participants (10 Chinese; 10 Malays; 10 Caucasians; and 10 Indians) consumed beverages containing 50 g of sucrose or isomaltulose on two separate occasions using a randomized crossover design. Capillary blood glucose was measured in a fasted state and at 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 min after beverage ingestion. Glycemic response to sucrose was significantly higher in Malays compared to Caucasians (p = 0.041), but did not differ between Caucasians vs. Chinese (p = 0.145) or vs. Indians (p = 0.661). When sucrose was replaced with isomaltulose, glycemic responses were significantly reduced in all ethnic groups, with the largest reduction in glycemic response being observed in Malays. Malays, who had the greatest glycemic response to sucrose, also showed the greatest improvement in glycemic response when sucrose was replaced with isomaltulose. This implies that Malays who are more susceptible to type 2 diabetes mellitus may benefit from strategies that replace high GI carbohydrate with lower GI alternatives to assist in glycemic control.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/nu9040347
Field of Research 1111 Nutrition And Dietetics
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30105338

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.