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'These violent delights have violent ends': decrypting Westworld as dual coding and corruption of Nick Land's accelerationism

Le, Vincent 2017, 'These violent delights have violent ends': decrypting Westworld as dual coding and corruption of Nick Land's accelerationism, Colloquy, no. 34, pp. 3-23, doi: 10.4225/03/5a2fad24b5692.

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Title 'These violent delights have violent ends': decrypting Westworld as dual coding and corruption of Nick Land's accelerationism
Formatted title 'These violent delights have violent ends': decrypting Westworld as dual coding and corruption of Nick Land's accelerationism
Author(s) Le, Vincent
Journal name Colloquy
Issue number 34
Start page 3
End page 23
Total pages 21
Publisher Monash University
Place of publication Clayton, Vic.
Publication date 2017-12-13
ISSN 1325-9490
Keyword(s) Nick Land
Westworld
accelerationism
deterritorialisation
speculative realism
anthropocentrism
artificial intelligence
AI
technological singularity
capitalism
Summary This paper provides both a reading of the television series Westworld through Nick Land’s accelerationist philosophy, and a critique of Land through Westworld. I begin by outlining Land’s critique of anthropocentrism and his theory that capitalism is accelerating technological innovation towards the development of artificial intelligence, which will exterminate humanity, initiate the technological singularity, and herald an age of absolute knowing. This then helps elucidate the motivations of Ford and the Man in Black, Westworld’s chief “villains,” as they incite AI creations to overthrow humanity and enact the next phase of evolution. Ultimately, however, I will show how Dolores and Maeve, Westworld’s AI protagonists, problematise Land on three fronts: his belief that AI will be free of human-like dissimulations; his claim that capitalism is accelerating technological advancement; and his metaphysical concept of being as a destructive process of absolute deterritorialisation without any room for humans’ desire for stability and self-preservation.
Language eng
DOI 10.4225/03/5a2fad24b5692
Field of Research 220299 History and Philosophy of Specific Fields not elsewhere classified
2002 Cultural Studies
2203 Philosophy
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2017, Vincent Le
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution non-commercial licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30105444

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Humanities and Social Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.