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iDNA at sea: recovery of whale shark (Rhincodon typus) mitochondrial DNA sequences from the whale shark copepod (Pandarus rhincodonicus) confirms global population structure

Meekan, Mark, Austin, Christopher M., Tan, Mun H., Wei, Nu-Wei V., Miller, Adam, Pierce, Simon J., Rowat, David, Stevens, Guy, Davies, Tim K., Ponzo, Alessandro and Gan, Han Ming 2017, iDNA at sea: recovery of whale shark (Rhincodon typus) mitochondrial DNA sequences from the whale shark copepod (Pandarus rhincodonicus) confirms global population structure, Frontiers in marine science, vol. 4, pp. 1-8, doi: 10.3389/fmars.2017.00420.

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Title iDNA at sea: recovery of whale shark (Rhincodon typus) mitochondrial DNA sequences from the whale shark copepod (Pandarus rhincodonicus) confirms global population structure
Formatted title iDNA at sea: recovery of whale shark (Rhincodon typus) mitochondrial DNA sequences from the whale shark copepod (Pandarus rhincodonicus) confirms global population structure
Author(s) Meekan, Mark
Austin, Christopher M.ORCID iD for Austin, Christopher M. orcid.org/0000-0003-1848-6267
Tan, Mun H.
Wei, Nu-Wei V.
Miller, AdamORCID iD for Miller, Adam orcid.org/0000-0002-1632-7206
Pierce, Simon J.
Rowat, David
Stevens, Guy
Davies, Tim K.
Ponzo, Alessandro
Gan, Han MingORCID iD for Gan, Han Ming orcid.org/0000-0001-7987-738X
Journal name Frontiers in marine science
Volume number 4
Article ID 420
Start page 1
End page 8
Total pages 8
Publisher Frontiers Media
Place of publication Lausanne, Switzerland
Publication date 2017-12
ISSN 2296-7745
2296-7745
Keyword(s) eDNA
sharks
minimally-invasive sampling
copepod
control region
population genetics
parasite
commensal
Summary The whale shark (Rhincodon typus) is an iconic and endangered species with a broad distribution spanning warm-temperate and tropical oceans. Effective conservation management of the species requires an understanding of the degree of genetic connectivity among populations, which is hampered by the need for sampling that involves invasive techniques. Here, the feasibility of minimally-invasive sampling was explored by isolating and sequencing whale shark DNA from a commensal or possibly parasitic copepod, Pandarus rhincodonicus that occurs on the skin of the host. We successfully recovered mitochondrial control region DNA sequences (~1,000 bp) of the host via DNA extraction and polymerase chain reaction from whole copepod specimens. DNA sequences obtained from multiple copepods collected from the same shark exhibited 100% sequence similarity, suggesting a persistent association of copepods with individual hosts. Newly-generated mitochondrial haplotypes of whale shark hosts derived from the copepods were included in an analysis of the genetic structure of the global population of whale sharks (644 sequences; 136 haplotypes). Our results supported those of previous studies and suggested limited genetic structuring across most of the species range, but the presence of a genetically unique and potentially isolated population in the Atlantic Ocean. Furthermore, we recovered the mitogenome and nuclear ribosomal genes of a whale shark using a shotgun sequencing approach on copepod tissue. The recovered mitogenome is the third mitogenome reported for the species and the first from the Mozambique population. Our invertebrate DNA (iDNA) approach could be used to better un derstand the population structure of whale sharks, particularly in the Atlantic Ocean, and also for genetic analyses of other elasmobranchs parasitized by pandarid copepods.
Language eng
DOI 10.3389/fmars.2017.00420
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, Meekan, Austin, Tan, Wei, Miller, Pierce, Rowat, Stevens, Davies, Ponzo and Gan.
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30105762

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.