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Dietary supplement use among Australian adults: findings from the 2011-2012 national nutrition and physical activity survey

Burnett, Alissa J, Livingstone, Katherine M, Woods, Julie L and McNaughton, Sarah A 2017, Dietary supplement use among Australian adults: findings from the 2011-2012 national nutrition and physical activity survey, Nutrients, vol. 9, no. 11, pp. 1-12, doi: 10.3390/nu9111248.

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Title Dietary supplement use among Australian adults: findings from the 2011-2012 national nutrition and physical activity survey
Author(s) Burnett, Alissa J
Livingstone, Katherine MORCID iD for Livingstone, Katherine M orcid.org/0000-0002-9682-7541
Woods, Julie LORCID iD for Woods, Julie L orcid.org/0000-0002-2717-310X
McNaughton, Sarah AORCID iD for McNaughton, Sarah A orcid.org/0000-0001-5936-9820
Journal name Nutrients
Volume number 9
Issue number 11
Article ID 1248
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 12
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2017-11
ISSN 2072-6643
Keyword(s) dietary intake
lifestyle
supplements
science & technology
life sciences & biomedicine
nutrition & dietetics
Summary (1) Background: Supplement use is prevalent worldwide; however, there are limited studies examining the characteristics of people who take supplements in Australia. This study aimed to investigate the demographics, lifestyle habits and health status of supplement users; (2) Methods: Adults aged >19 years (n= 4895) were included from the 2011-2012 National Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey (NNPAS). A supplement user was defined as anyone who took one or more supplements on either of two 24-h dietary recalls. Poisson regression was used to estimate the prevalence ratio (PR) of supplement use, according to demographics, lifestyle characteristics and health status of participants; (3) Results: Supplement use was reported by 47% of women and 34% of men, and supplement use was higher among older age groups, among those with higher education levels and from areas reflecting the least socioeconomic disadvantaged. An association was found between blood pressure and supplement use; (4) Conclusions: A substantial proportion of Australians take supplements. Further investigation into the social, psychological and economic determinants that motivate the use of supplements is required, to ensure appropriate use of supplements among Australian adults.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/nu9111248
Field of Research 1111 Nutrition And Dietetics
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30105904

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.