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Enhanced skeletal muscle ribosome biogenesis, yet attenuated mTORC1 and ribosome biogenesis-related signalling, following short-term concurrent versus single-mode resistance training

Fyfe, Jackson J, Bishop, David J, Bartlett, Jonathan D, Hanson, Erik D, Anderson, Mitchell J, Garnham, Andrew P and Stepto, Nigel K 2018, Enhanced skeletal muscle ribosome biogenesis, yet attenuated mTORC1 and ribosome biogenesis-related signalling, following short-term concurrent versus single-mode resistance training, Scientific reports, vol. 8, pp. 1-21, doi: 10.1038/s41598-017-18887-6.

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Title Enhanced skeletal muscle ribosome biogenesis, yet attenuated mTORC1 and ribosome biogenesis-related signalling, following short-term concurrent versus single-mode resistance training
Author(s) Fyfe, Jackson JORCID iD for Fyfe, Jackson J orcid.org/0000-0002-9541-2336
Bishop, David J
Bartlett, Jonathan D
Hanson, Erik D
Anderson, Mitchell J
Garnham, Andrew P
Stepto, Nigel K
Journal name Scientific reports
Volume number 8
Article ID 560
Start page 1
End page 21
Total pages 21
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2018-01-12
ISSN 2045-2322
Keyword(s) skeletal muscle ribosome biogenesis
mTORC1
ribosome biogenesis
signalling
resistance training
endurance training
skeletal muscle hypertrophic adaptation
science & technology
Summary Combining endurance training with resistance training (RT) may attenuate skeletal muscle hypertrophic adaptation versus RT alone; however, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. We investigated changes in markers of ribosome biogenesis, a process linked with skeletal muscle hypertrophy, following concurrent training versus RT alone. Twenty-three males underwent eight weeks of RT, either performed alone (RT group, n = 8), or combined with either high-intensity interval training (HIT+RT group, n = 8), or moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT+RT group, n = 7). Muscle samples (vastus lateralis) were obtained before training, and immediately before, 1 h and 3 h after the final training session. Training-induced changes in basal expression of the 45S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) precursor (45S pre-rRNA), and 5.8S and 28S mature rRNAs, were greater with concurrent training versus RT. However, during the final training session, RT further increased both mTORC1 (p70S6K1 and rps6 phosphorylation) and 45S pre-rRNA transcription-related signalling (TIF-1A and UBF phosphorylation) versus concurrent training. These data suggest that when performed in a training-accustomed state, RT induces further increases mTORC1 and ribosome biogenesis-related signalling in human skeletal muscle versus concurrent training; however, changes in ribosome biogenesis markers were more favourable following a period of short-term concurrent training versus RT performed alone.
Language eng
DOI 10.1038/s41598-017-18887-6
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2018, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30105908

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.