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From radical transparency to radical disclosure: reconfiguring (in)voluntary transparency through the management of visibilities

Heemsbergen, Luke 2016, From radical transparency to radical disclosure: reconfiguring (in)voluntary transparency through the management of visibilities, International journal of communication, vol. 10, pp. 138-151.

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Title From radical transparency to radical disclosure: reconfiguring (in)voluntary transparency through the management of visibilities
Author(s) Heemsbergen, LukeORCID iD for Heemsbergen, Luke orcid.org/0000-0001-8600-5280
Journal name International journal of communication
Volume number 10
Start page 138
End page 151
Total pages 14
Publisher University of Southern California's Annenberg Center for Communication
Place of publication Los Angeles, Calif.
Publication date 2016
ISSN 1932-8036
Keyword(s) radical disclosure
radical transparency
visibility management
digital leaking
social shaming
Summary This article challenges how the concepts of voluntary and involuntary transparency are understood in the digital age by focusing on the management of involuntary and voluntary disclosure. We tend to understand radical transparency through new forms of involuntary networked data dissemination, spread without the consent or knowledge of whoever held the data. This view conflates the politics of exclusion with crucial questions of compulsion. At the same time, radical transparency’s promise to end secrecy has not materialized. Instead, the social-material relations underpinning digital disclosures suggest they function to reconfigure visibilities of control and recognition rather than reveal extant objects. Thus, the article introduces a typology of disclosure to better understand the involuntary and autonomous and inclusive and exclusionary dimensions of managing visibility in the digital era. It then explores two sets of empirical “radical disclosure” practices, made with purpose but without consent, to articulate how digital disclosures reconfigure visibility and set limits and opportunities in society. The article concludes with a suggestion toward ramifications for governance and autonomy.
Language eng
Field of Research 200102 Communication Technology and Digital Media Studies
1902 Film, Television And Digital Media
1903 Journalism And Professional Writing
2001 Communication And Media Studies
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2016, The Author
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No-Derivatives licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30105947

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Communication and Creative Arts
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.