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Leaking boats and borders: the virtu of surveilling Australia’s refugee population

Heemsbergen, Luke and Daly, Angela 2017, Leaking boats and borders: the virtu of surveilling Australia’s refugee population, Surveillance and society, vol. 15, no. 3/4, Special issue: surveillance and the global turn to authoritarianism, pp. 389-396.

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Title Leaking boats and borders: the virtu of surveilling Australia’s refugee population
Author(s) Heemsbergen, Luke
Daly, Angela
Journal name Surveillance and society
Volume number 15
Issue number 3/4
Season Special issue: surveillance and the global turn to authoritarianism
Start page 389
End page 396
Total pages 8
Publisher Surveillance Studies Network
Place of publication [London, Eng.]
Publication date 2017-08-10
ISSN 1477-7487
Keyword(s) refugees
Australia
offshore detention centre
surveillance
privacy
Manus Island
Nauru
immigration law
visibility
Summary When refugees displaced to Australia’s offshore detention do speak, it is through surveillance upended through publicity and violations of privacy. Weak legal rights to privacy in Australia juxtapose the increasing secrecy under which the Australian state operates its own offshore detention centres (Manus Island and Nauru) while increasing the mandate of data retention at home. Australia’s institutional context offers visibility to these concerns of surveillance whereby we find an acceleration of prohibitive privacy for government and prohibitive transparency for individuals. Our analysis of this country synthesises media-law in practice with theories of mediated visibility (Flyverbom 2016, 2017; Brighenti 2010), to understand Australian privacy, media and immigration law in the context of pervasive surveillance and the radical management of visibility. Our contribution speaks to applicable privacy concerns for states grappling with invasive data collection and its relation to the (prohibiting of the private) voice of the surveilled, which we see as doubly acute for those left vulnerable in Australia’s borderzones.
Language eng
Field of Research 200102 Communication Technology and Digital Media Studies
1602 Criminology
1608 Sociology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No-Derivatives licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30105964

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Communication and Creative Arts
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.