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The REVAMP natural experiment study: the impact of a play-scape installation on park visitation and park-based physical activity

Veitch, Jenny, Salmon, Jo, Crawford, David, Abbott, Gavin, Giles-Corti, Billie, Carver, Alison and Timperio, Anna 2018, The REVAMP natural experiment study: the impact of a play-scape installation on park visitation and park-based physical activity, International journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity, vol. 15, no. 1, doi: 10.1186/s12966-017-0625-5.

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Title The REVAMP natural experiment study: the impact of a play-scape installation on park visitation and park-based physical activity
Author(s) Veitch, JennyORCID iD for Veitch, Jenny orcid.org/0000-0001-8962-0887
Salmon, JoORCID iD for Salmon, Jo orcid.org/0000-0002-4734-6354
Crawford, DavidORCID iD for Crawford, David orcid.org/0000-0002-2467-7556
Abbott, GavinORCID iD for Abbott, Gavin orcid.org/0000-0003-4014-0705
Giles-Corti, Billie
Carver, AlisonORCID iD for Carver, Alison orcid.org/0000-0001-5166-3574
Timperio, AnnaORCID iD for Timperio, Anna orcid.org/0000-0002-8773-5012
Journal name International journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity
Volume number 15
Issue number 1
Article ID 10
Total pages 14
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2018-01-25
ISSN 1479-5868
Keyword(s) Natural experiment
Park refurbishment
Park visitation
Physical activity
Play-scape
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Nutrition & Dietetics
Physiology
URBAN GREEN SPACE
POPULATION HEALTH
NEIGHBORHOOD
RECOMMENDATIONS
INTERVENTIONS
ASSOCIATIONS
RENOVATIONS
WALKING
Summary Background
Designing parks that optimise visitation and support visitors to be active is important for public health. Yet there is very little evidence about whether playground refurbishment achieves these objectives. This study examined the impact of the installation of a play-scape in a large metropolitan park in Melbourne, Australia.

Methods
Natural experiment study (intervention vs control). At both parks, park visitation and physical activity were assessed before (T1, 2013) and after the intervention at 12 (T2, 2014) and 24 months (T3, 2015). At each time point, measures included: observations of park visitors using the System for Observing Play and Recreation in Communities on four weekdays and four weekend days, objective monitors to record usage of the walking paths and the number of cars entering the park; and intercept surveys with adult park visitors. Cross-sectional surveys were conducted with local residents at T1 and T3.

Results
The observational data showed a 176% increase in park visitor counts from T1 to T2 (Incidence Rate Ratio (IRR) = 2.76, 95% CI = 1.04–7.33), at the intervention park relative to the control park. The intervention park had a 119% increase in counts of visitors observed engaging in MVPA from T1 to T2 (IRR = 2.19, 95% CI = 1.14–4.20), and a 128% increase from T1 to T3 (IRR = 2.28, 95% CI = 1.19–4.38), relative to the control park. The relative increases in visitation at the intervention park play-scape compared with the control park playground were highly statistically significant from both T1 to T2 (IRR = 18.12, 95% CI = 5.51–59.59) and T1 to T3 (IRR = 15.05, 95% CI = 4.61–49.16). Similarly, there was a significant interaction between time and park with regard to the number of visitors observed engaging in MVPA in the play-scape/playground areas. The intercept survey data showed an increased odds of children’s regular visitation to the intervention park at T2 (OR = 2.67, 95% CI = 1.08, 6.64), compared with T1, relative to the control park. The remaining results from the intercept survey, objective monitors and resident surveys showed no significant differences in visitation between the two parks.

Conclusions
These findings confirm that a well-designed play-scape installation has the potential to increase park visitation and encourage visitors to be physically active.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12966-017-0625-5
Field of Research 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
11 Medical And Health Sciences
13 Education
Socio Economic Objective 920401 Behaviour and Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Grant ID ARC LP120200396
Copyright notice ©2018, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30106112

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.