Socioeconomic inequities in diet quality and nutrient intakes among Australian adults: findings from a nationally representative cross-sectional study

Livingstone, Katherine M., Olstad, Dana Lee, Leech, Rebecca M., Ball, Kylie, Meertens, Beth, Potter, Jane, Cleanthous, Xenia, Reynolds, Rachael and Mcnaughton, Sarah A. 2017, Socioeconomic inequities in diet quality and nutrient intakes among Australian adults: findings from a nationally representative cross-sectional study, Nutrients, vol. 9, no. 10, doi: 10.3390/nu9101092.

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Title Socioeconomic inequities in diet quality and nutrient intakes among Australian adults: findings from a nationally representative cross-sectional study
Author(s) Livingstone, Katherine M.ORCID iD for Livingstone, Katherine M. orcid.org/0000-0002-9682-7541
Olstad, Dana Lee
Leech, Rebecca M.ORCID iD for Leech, Rebecca M. orcid.org/0000-0002-5333-0164
Ball, KylieORCID iD for Ball, Kylie orcid.org/0000-0003-2893-8415
Meertens, Beth
Potter, Jane
Cleanthous, Xenia
Reynolds, Rachael
Mcnaughton, Sarah A.ORCID iD for Mcnaughton, Sarah A. orcid.org/0000-0001-5936-9820
Journal name Nutrients
Volume number 9
Issue number 10
Total pages 17
Publisher M D P I AG
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2017-10-04
ISSN 2072-6643
Keyword(s) diet quality
education
income
inequity
nutrient intake
socioeconomic position
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Nutrition & Dietetics
ENERGY-INTAKE
INEQUALITIES
CONSUMPTION
HEALTH
FRUIT
ASSOCIATION
DISPARITIES
POPULATION
PATTERNS
POSITION
Summary Poor diet may represent one pathway through which lower socioeconomic position (SEP) leads to adverse health outcomes. This study examined the associations between SEP and diet quality, its components, energy, and nutrients in a nationally representative sample of Australians. Dietary data from two 24-h recalls collected during the cross-sectional Australian Health Survey 2011-13 (n= 4875; aged ≥ 19 years) were analysed. Diet quality was evaluated using the Dietary Guidelines Index (DGI). SEP was assessed by index of area-level socioeconomic disadvantage, education level, and household income. Linear regression analyses investigated the associations between measures of SEP and dietary intakes. Across all of the SEP indicators, compared with the least disadvantaged group, the most disadvantaged group had 2.5-4.5 units lower DGI. A greater area-level disadvantage was associated with higher carbohydrate and total sugars intake. Lower education was associated with higher trans fat, carbohydrate, and total sugars intake and lower poly-unsaturated fat and fibre intake. Lower income was associated with lower total energy and protein intake and higher carbohydrate and trans fat intake. Lower SEP was generally associated with poorer diet quality and nutrient intakes, highlighting dietary inequities among Australian adults, and a need to develop policy that addresses these inequities.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/nu9101092
Field of Research 1111 Nutrition And Dietetics
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30106222

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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