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A smart-phone intervention to address mental health stigma in the construction industry: a two-arm randomised controlled trial

Milner, A., Law, P. C. F., Mann, C., Cooper, T., Witt, K. and LaMontagne, A. D. 2018, A smart-phone intervention to address mental health stigma in the construction industry: a two-arm randomised controlled trial, SSM Population health, vol. 4, pp. 164-168, doi: 10.1016/j.ssmph.2017.12.007.

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Title A smart-phone intervention to address mental health stigma in the construction industry: a two-arm randomised controlled trial
Author(s) Milner, A.ORCID iD for Milner, A. orcid.org/0000-0003-4657-0503
Law, P. C. F.
Mann, C.
Cooper, T.
Witt, K.
LaMontagne, A. D.ORCID iD for LaMontagne, A. D. orcid.org/0000-0002-5811-5906
Journal name SSM Population health
Volume number 4
Start page 164
End page 168
Total pages 5
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2018-04
ISSN 2352-8273
Keyword(s) Self-blame
construction
help-seeking inhibition
mental health
shame
stigma
Summary Background
High levels of self-stigma are associated with a range of adverse mental health, treatment, and functional outcomes. This prospective study examined the effects of an electronic mental health stigma reduction intervention on self-stigma (self-blame, shame, and help-seeking inhibition) among male construction workers in Australia.

Method
Male construction workers (N = 682) were randomly assigned to receive either the intervention condition or the wait list control over a six-week period. Self-stigma was assessed using the Self-Stigma of Depression Scale at post-intervention. We conducted linear regression to assess the effectiveness of the intervention on self-stigma, adjusting for relevant covariates.

Results
Self-stigma was relatively low in the sample. The intervention had no significant effect on self-stigma, after adjusting for confounders. There were reductions in stigma in both the intervention and control groups at 6-week follow-up. Process evaluation indicated that participants generally enjoyed the program and felt that it was beneficial to their mental health.

Conclusions
These observations underscore the need for further research to elucidate understanding of the experience of self-stigma among employed males.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.ssmph.2017.12.007
Field of Research 111714 Mental Health
111705 Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety
Socio Economic Objective 920405 Environmental Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2018, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No-Derivatives licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30106265

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Health and Social Development
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.