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Settler governance and privacy: Canada’s Indian residential school settlement agreement and the mediation of state-based violence

Fullenwieder, Lara and Molnar, Adam 2018, Settler governance and privacy: Canada’s Indian residential school settlement agreement and the mediation of state-based violence, International journal of communication, vol. 12, pp. 1332-1349.

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Title Settler governance and privacy: Canada’s Indian residential school settlement agreement and the mediation of state-based violence
Author(s) Fullenwieder, Lara
Molnar, AdamORCID iD for Molnar, Adam orcid.org/0000-0003-3285-648X
Journal name International journal of communication
Volume number 12
Start page 1332
End page 1349
Total pages 18
Publisher University of Southern California
Place of publication Los Angeles, Calif.
Publication date 2018-03-05
ISSN 1932-8036
Keyword(s) Social Sciences
Communication
privacy
settler colonialism
liberal governmentality
reconciliation
COLONIALISM
Summary In 2007, the Indian Residential School Settlement Agreement (IRSSA) was developed to redress the violent and assimilative history of residential schools in Canada. The records collected through the IRSSA represent the most comprehensive documentation of violence against Indigenous populations in Canada: data that range from personal testimonials and records, medical histories, and institutional documents to tested legal statements regarding physical and sexual abuse and its effects. The implementation of the IRSSA has been punctuated by legal conflicts that mobilize discourses and laws centering on liberal-conceived rights concerning access to information and privacy. In this article, we examine how liberal discourses of privacy knowledge and uses of privacy law inform histories and futures of Indigenous and settler memory in the context of state-based violence. The article reveals how liberal notions of privacy, when mobilized alongside federally mandated policies of reconciliation, may reproduce the structural violence of settler colonial governance in liberal democracies.
Language eng
Field of Research 180119 Law and Society
180120 Legal Institutions (incl Courts and Justice Systems)
200211 Postcolonial Studies
160299 Criminology not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 940499 Justice and the Law not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2018, Lara Fullenwieder and Adam Molnar
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No-Derivatives licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30106626

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Humanities and Social Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.