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Using Twitter to access the human right of communication for people who use Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC)

Hemsley, Bronwyn, Palmer, Stuart, Dann, Stephen and Balandin, Susan 2018, Using Twitter to access the human right of communication for people who use Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC), International journal of speech-language pathology, vol. 20, no. 1, pp. 50-58, doi: 10.1080/17549507.2017.1413137.

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Title Using Twitter to access the human right of communication for people who use Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC)
Author(s) Hemsley, Bronwyn
Palmer, StuartORCID iD for Palmer, Stuart orcid.org/0000-0002-2517-0597
Dann, Stephen
Balandin, SusanORCID iD for Balandin, Susan orcid.org/0000-0003-4765-8232
Journal name International journal of speech-language pathology
Volume number 20
Issue number 1
Start page 50
End page 58
Total pages 9
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Place of publication Abingdon, Eng.
Publication date 2018-02
ISSN 1441-7049
1754-9515
Keyword(s) AAC
Article 19
Twitter
United Nations
Universal Declaration of Human Rights
complex communication needs
social media
Science & Technology
Social Sciences
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Audiology & Speech-Language Pathology
Linguistics
Rehabilitation
DISABILITIES
Summary Purpose: Articles 19, 26 and 27 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and Articles 4, 9 and 21 of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities promote the human rights of communication, education, use of technology and access to information. Social media is an important form of online communication, and Twitter increases users’ visibility, influence and reach online. The aim of this sociotechnical research was to determine the impact of teaching three people who use Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) to use Twitter.

Method:
Three participants were trained in ways of using Twitter strategically. Data collected from participants’ Twitter profiles were examined to determine the impact of training on Twitter follower count, frequency of tweeting, tweet content and the development of social networks. Data were also examined using (1) KH Coder software analysis and visualisation of co-occurring networks in the text data, based on word frequencies; and (2) Gephi software analysis to show the Twitter network for each participant.

Result: Two participants showed an improvement in Twitter skills and strategies.

Conclusions: Twitter can be used to improve social connectedness of people who use AAC, and should not be overlooked in relation to communication rights.
Language eng
DOI 10.1080/17549507.2017.1413137
Field of Research 100503 Computer Communications Networks
180114 Human Rights Law
1103 Clinical Sciences
1702 Cognitive Science
2004 Linguistics
Socio Economic Objective 890199 Communication Networks and Services not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2018, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No-Derivatives licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30106631

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Engineering
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.