Openly accessible

Glycerophospholipid supplementation as a potential intervention for supporting cerebral structure in older adults

Reddan, Jeffery M., White, David J., Macpherson, Helen, Scholey, Andrew and Pipingas, Andrew 2018, Glycerophospholipid supplementation as a potential intervention for supporting cerebral structure in older adults, Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience, doi: 10.3389/fnagi.2018.00049.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Glycerophospholipid supplementation as a potential intervention for supporting cerebral structure in older adults
Author(s) Reddan, Jeffery M.
White, David J.
Macpherson, HelenORCID iD for Macpherson, Helen orcid.org/0000-0002-3603-9359
Scholey, Andrew
Pipingas, Andrew
Journal name Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience
Total pages 26
Publisher Frontiers Research Foundation
Place of publication Lausanne, Switzerland
Publication date 2018-03-07
ISSN 1663-4365
Keyword(s) glycerophospholipid
supplementation
intervention
cerebral structure
older adults
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Geriatrics & Gerontology
Neurosciences
Neurosciences & Neurology
mild cognitive impairment
blood-brain barrier
long chanin Omega-2 fatty acids
white matter integrity
lecithin transphosphatidylated phosphatidylserine
randomized controlled trials
polysaturated fatty acids
placebo controlled trial
medial temporal lobe
C-reactive protein
Summary Modifying nutritional intake through supplementation may be efficacious for altering the trajectory of cerebral structural decline evident with increasing age. To date, there have been a number of clinical trials in older adults whereby chronic supplementation with B vitamins, omega-3 fatty acids, or resveratrol, has been observed to either slow the rate of decline or repair cerebral tissue. There is also some evidence from animal studies indicating that supplementation with glycerophospholipids (GPL) may benefit cerebral structure, though these effects have not yet been investigated in adult humans. Despite this paucity of research, there are a number of factors predicting poorer cerebral structure in older humans, which GPL supplementation appears to beneficially modify or protect against. These include elevated concentrations of homocysteine, unbalanced activity of reactive oxygen species both increasing the risk of oxidative stress, increased concentrations of pro-inflammatory messengers, as well as poorer cardio- and cerebrovascular function. As such, it is hypothesized that GPL supplementation will support cerebral structure in older adults. These cerebral effects may influence cognitive function. The current review aims to provide a theoretical basis for future clinical trials investigating the effects of GPL supplementation on cerebral structural integrity in older adults.
Language eng
DOI 10.3389/fnagi.2018.00049
Field of Research 1109 Neurosciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2018, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30106777

Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 1 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 2 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 163 Abstract Views, 1 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Mon, 12 Mar 2018, 12:58:21 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.