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Nanofiber-based materials for persistent organic pollutants in water remediation by adsorption

des Ligneris, Elise, Dumee, Ludovic and Kong, Lingxue 2018, Nanofiber-based materials for persistent organic pollutants in water remediation by adsorption, Applied sciences, vol. 8, no. 2, doi: 10.3390/app8020166.

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Title Nanofiber-based materials for persistent organic pollutants in water remediation by adsorption
Author(s) des Ligneris, Elise
Dumee, LudovicORCID iD for Dumee, Ludovic orcid.org/0000-0002-0264-4024
Kong, LingxueORCID iD for Kong, Lingxue orcid.org/0000-0001-6219-3897
Journal name Applied sciences
Volume number 8
Issue number 2
Article ID 166
Total pages 40
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2018-01-24
ISSN 2076-3417
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Physical Sciences
Technology
Chemistry, Multidisciplinary
Materials Science, Multidisciplinary
Physics, Applied
Chemistry
Materials Science
Physics
nanofibers
adsorption
organic pollution
persistent organic pollutant POP
adsorption mechanisms
adsorbent characteristics
surface chemistry
pesticides
disinfectants
phenol
RESPONSE-SURFACE METHODOLOGY
MAGNETIC BIOCHAR COMPOSITES
ACTIVATED CARBON
AQUEOUS-SOLUTION
PHENOLIC-COMPOUNDS
WASTE-WATER
PENTACHLOROPHENOL ADSORPTION
ORGANOCHLORINE PESTICIDES
ENHANCED ADSORPTION
DIAZINON PESTICIDE
Summary Fresh water is one of the most precious resources for our society. As a cause of oxygen depletion, organic pollutants released into water streams from industrial discharges, fertilizers, pesticides, detergents or consumed medicines can raise toxicological concerns due to their long-range transportability, bio-accumulation and degradation into carcinogenic compounds. The Stockholm Convention has named 21 persistent organic pollutants (POP) so far. As opposed to other separation techniques, adsorption, typically performed with activated carbons, offers opportunities to combine low operation costs with high performance as well as fast kinetics of capture if custom-designed with the right choice of adsorbent structure and surface chemistry. Nanofibers possess a higher surface to volume ratio compared to commercial macro-adsorbents, and a higher stability in water than other adsorptive nanostructures, such as loose nanoparticles. This paper highlights the potential of nanofibers in organic pollutant adsorption and thus provides an up-to-date overview of their employment for the treatment of wastewater contaminated by disinfectants and pesticides, which is benchmarked with other reported adsorptive structures. The discussion further investigates the impact of adsorbent pore geometry and surface chemistry on the resulting adsorption performance against specific organic molecules. Finally, insight into the physicochemical properties required for an adsorbent against a targeted pollutant is provided.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/app8020166
Copyright notice ©2018, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30107079

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.