Openly accessible

Subsurface Behavior of Ductile Material by Particle Impacts and its Influence on Wear Mechanism

Biswas, Subhankar, Cenna, Ahmed, Williams, Kenneth and Jones, Mark 2014, Subsurface Behavior of Ductile Material by Particle Impacts and its Influence on Wear Mechanism, Procedia Engineering, vol. 90, pp. 160-165, doi: 10.1016/j.proeng.2014.11.830.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
biswas-subsurfacebehavior-2014.pdf Published version application/pdf 1.42MB 2

Title Subsurface Behavior of Ductile Material by Particle Impacts and its Influence on Wear Mechanism
Author(s) Biswas, SubhankarORCID iD for Biswas, Subhankar orcid.org/0000-0003-2236-9602
Cenna, Ahmed
Williams, Kenneth
Jones, Mark
Journal name Procedia Engineering
Volume number 90
Start page 160
End page 165
Total pages 6
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2014
ISSN 1877-7058
Keyword(s) Erosion rate
energy factors
impact velocity
wear mechanism
subsurface properties
Summary Erosion is observed in many industrial situations such as pneumatic conveying pipelines, shot peening and sand blasting where interaction between particle and surface is expected. A number of particle impact parameters and material surface properties are involved in the erosion process. Extensive studies have been conducted to understand the effects of the process parameters on erosion; however, only limited studies can be found in the literature associated with material surface and subsurface properties. In order to get a better understanding of the material surface and subsurface behaviour due to particle impacts for different parameters, erosion tests were performed for different impact angles and different particle velocities using a micro-sandblaster. Angular silicon carbide (SiC) particles were impacted on two different ductile surfaces, mild steel and aluminium, with a constant particle flux. Wear mechanisms were studied in terms of particle kinetic energy. Subsequently, the worn surfaces and their cross-sections were observed using scanning electron microscope (SEM) to relate the subsurface damage characteristics to different impact conditions, and to wear mechanisms. Results showed that at a lower impact angle, material was removed through cutting mechanism, while at a higher angle; material removed through predominantly deformation process. Also, subsurface cracking and subsurface damage were observed up to a certain depth from the worn surface. It appears both the depth of subsurface cracking and subsurface damages increases with increasing impact velocity. The variation is consistent with increase in surface and subsurface temperature at higher velocities. With increased temperature, the depth of the heat affected zone increases, which increases the work hardening layer thickness. In addition, subsurface microstructural damage is consistent with attainment of higher temperature which can be explained through the high strain-rate deformation and thermo-physical properties of the surface.
Notes This paper was presented at the 10th International Conference on Mechanical Engineering, ICME 2013
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.proeng.2014.11.830
Field of Research MD Multidisciplinary
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2015, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No-Derivatives licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30107137

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Institute for Frontier Materials
Open Access Collection
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 12 Abstract Views, 6 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 06 Apr 2018, 16:26:56 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.