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Decoding disclosure: comparing conflict of interest policy among the United States, France, and Australia

Grundy, Quinn, Habibi, Roojin, Shnier, Adrienne, Mayes, Christopher and Lipworth, Wendy 2018, Decoding disclosure: comparing conflict of interest policy among the United States, France, and Australia, Health policy, vol. 122, no. 5, pp. 509-518, doi: 10.1016/j.healthpol.2018.03.015.

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Title Decoding disclosure: comparing conflict of interest policy among the United States, France, and Australia
Author(s) Grundy, Quinn
Habibi, Roojin
Shnier, Adrienne
Mayes, ChristopherORCID iD for Mayes, Christopher orcid.org/0000-0003-2674-6225
Lipworth, Wendy
Journal name Health policy
Volume number 122
Issue number 5
Start page 509
End page 518
Total pages 10
Publisher Elsevier
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publication date 2018-05
ISSN 1872-6054
Keyword(s) Comparative analysis
Conflict of interest
Disclosure
Pharmaceutical industry
Transparency
Summary "Sunshine" policy, aimed at making financial ties between health professionals and industry publicly transparent, has recently gone global. Given that transparency is not the sole means of managing conflict of interest, and is unlikely to be effective on its own, it is important to understand why disclosure has emerged as a predominant public policy solution, and what the effects of this focus on transparency might be. We used Carol Bacchi's problem-questioning approach to policy analysis to compare the Sunshine policies in three different jurisdictions, the United States, France and Australia. We found that transparency had emerged as a solution to several different problems including misuse of tax dollars, patient safety and public trust. Despite these differences in the origins of disclosure policies, all were underpinned by the questionable assumption that informed consumers could address conflicts of interest. We conclude that, while transparency reports have provided an unprecedented opportunity to understand the reach of industry within healthcare, policymakers should build upon these insights and begin to develop policy solutions that address systemic commercial influence.
Language eng
DOI 10.1016/j.healthpol.2018.03.015
Field of Research 111799 Public Health and Health Services not elsewhere classified
160599 Policy and Administration not elsewhere classified
1117 Public Health And Health Services
1605 Policy And Administration
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2018, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No-Derivatives licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30107589

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.