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Exploring key issues of aerobic scope interpretation in ectotherms: absolute versus factorial

Halsey, Lewis G., Killen, Shaun S., Clark, Timothy D. and Norin, Tommy 2018, Exploring key issues of aerobic scope interpretation in ectotherms: absolute versus factorial, Reviews in fish biology and fisheries, vol. 28, no. 2, pp. 405-415, doi: 10.1007/s11160-018-9516-3.

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Title Exploring key issues of aerobic scope interpretation in ectotherms: absolute versus factorial
Author(s) Halsey, Lewis G.
Killen, Shaun S.
Clark, Timothy D.ORCID iD for Clark, Timothy D. orcid.org/0000-0001-8738-3347
Norin, Tommy
Journal name Reviews in fish biology and fisheries
Volume number 28
Issue number 2
Start page 405
End page 415
Total pages 11
Publisher Springer
Place of publication Cham, Switzerland
Publication date 2018-06
ISSN 0960-3166
1573-5184
Keyword(s) Allometry
Bioenergetics
Locomotion
Metabolic rate
Respiration
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Fisheries
Marine & Freshwater Biology
SALMON ONCORHYNCHUS-NERKA
STANDARD METABOLIC-RATE
GADUS-MORHUA L
CLIMATE-CHANGE
OXYGEN-CONSUMPTION
BODY-TEMPERATURE
ATLANTIC COD
LIFE-STYLE
FISHES
RESPIROMETRY
Summary Aerobic scope represents an animal’s capacity to increase its aerobic metabolic rate above maintenance levels (i.e. the difference between standard (SMR) and maximum (MMR) metabolic rates). Aerobic scope data can be presented in absolute or factorial terms (AAS or FAS, respectively). However, the robustness of these calculations to noise or variability in measures of metabolic rate can influence subsequent interpretations of patterns in the data. We explored this issue using simple models and we compared the predictions from these models to experimental data from the literature. First, we investigated the robustness of aerobic scope calculations as a function of varying SMR when MMR is fixed, and vice versa. While FAS is unexpectedly robust to variability in SMR, even in species with low aerobic scopes, AAS is less sensitive to variation in SMR than is FAS. However, where variation in MMR is the main concern, FAS is more robust than AAS. Our findings highlight the equal importance of minimising variability in MMR, rather than just the variability in SMR, to obtain robust aerobic scope estimates. Second, we analysed metabolic rate accounting for locomotor speed and body mass for swimming fish. The interactions among these factors in relation to AAS and FAS are complex and the appropriate metric is dependent on the specific eco-physiological context of the research question. We conclude with qualified recommendations for using and interpreting AAS and FAS.
Language eng
DOI 10.1007/s11160-018-9516-3
Field of Research 0704 Fisheries Sciences
0608 Zoology
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2018, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30107716

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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