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Long-term exposure to elevated carbon dioxide does not alter activity levels of a coral reef fish in response to predator chemical cues

Sundin, Josefin, Amcoff, Mirjam, Mateos-González, Fernando, Raby, Graham D., Jutfelt, Fredrik and Clark, Timothy D. 2017, Long-term exposure to elevated carbon dioxide does not alter activity levels of a coral reef fish in response to predator chemical cues, Behavioral ecology and sociobiology, vol. 71, no. 108, pp. 1-12, doi: 10.1007/s00265-017-2337-x.

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Title Long-term exposure to elevated carbon dioxide does not alter activity levels of a coral reef fish in response to predator chemical cues
Author(s) Sundin, Josefin
Amcoff, Mirjam
Mateos-González, Fernando
Raby, Graham D.
Jutfelt, Fredrik
Clark, Timothy D.ORCID iD for Clark, Timothy D. orcid.org/0000-0001-8738-3347
Journal name Behavioral ecology and sociobiology
Volume number 71
Issue number 108
Start page 1
End page 12
Total pages 12
Publisher Springer Verlag
Place of publication Berlin, Germany
Publication date 2017-08
ISSN 0340-5443
1432-0762
Keyword(s) Alarm cue
Climate change
Ocean acidification
Olfaction
Pomacentridae
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Behavioral Sciences
Ecology
Zoology
Environmental Sciences & Ecology
Alarmcue
MARINE FISH
ANTIPREDATOR RESPONSES
CORYPHAENA-HIPPURUS
FORAGING BEHAVIOR
LIFE-HISTORY
CO2
RECOGNITION
DAMSELFISH
LARVAE
Summary Levels of dissolved carbon dioxide (CO2) projected to occur in the world’s oceans in the near future have been reported to increase swimming activity and impair predator recognition in coral reef fishes. These behavioral alterations would be expected to have dramatic effects on survival and community dynamics in marine ecosystems in the future. To investigate the universality and replicability of these observations, we used juvenile spiny chromis damselfish (Acanthochromis polyacanthus) to examine the effects of long-term CO2 exposure on routine activity and the behavioral response to the chemical cues of a predator (Cephalopholis urodeta). Commencing at ~3–20 days post-hatch, juvenile damselfish were exposed to present-day CO2 levels (~420 μatm) or to levels forecasted for the year 2100 (~1000 μatm) for 3 months of their development. Thereafter, we assessed routine activity before and after injections of seawater (sham injection, control) or seawater-containing predator chemical cues. There was no effect of CO2 treatment on routine activity levels before or after the injections. All fish decreased their swimming activity following the predator cue injection but not following the sham injection, regardless of CO2 treatment. Our results corroborate findings from a growing number of studies reporting limited or no behavioral responses of fishes to elevated CO2.
Language eng
DOI 10.1007/s00265-017-2337-x
Field of Research 06 Biological Sciences
05 Environmental Sciences
07 Agricultural And Veterinary Sciences
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30107752

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.