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Detection and characterisation of coronaviruses in migratory and non-migratory Australian wild birds

Chamings, Anthony, Nelson, Tiffanie M., Vibin, Jessy, Wille, Michelle, Klaassen, Marcel and Alexandersen, Soren 2018, Detection and characterisation of coronaviruses in migratory and non-migratory Australian wild birds, Scientific reports, vol. 8, pp. 1-10, doi: 10.1038/s41598-018-24407-x.

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Title Detection and characterisation of coronaviruses in migratory and non-migratory Australian wild birds
Author(s) Chamings, AnthonyORCID iD for Chamings, Anthony orcid.org/0000-0002-7762-4757
Nelson, Tiffanie M.ORCID iD for Nelson, Tiffanie M. orcid.org/0000-0002-5341-312X
Vibin, Jessy
Wille, Michelle
Klaassen, MarcelORCID iD for Klaassen, Marcel orcid.org/0000-0003-3907-9599
Alexandersen, SorenORCID iD for Alexandersen, Soren orcid.org/0000-0002-5039-3178
Journal name Scientific reports
Volume number 8
Article ID 5980
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2018-04
ISSN 2045-2322
2045-2322
Keyword(s) Science & Technology
Multidisciplinary Sciences
Science & Technology - Other Topics
INFECTIOUS-BRONCHITIS-VIRUS
INFLUENZA-A VIRUS
NUCLEOTIDE SUBSTITUTIONS
AVIAN CORONAVIRUSES
RECOMBINATION
STRAINS
IDENTIFICATION
SURVEILLANCE
POPULATIONS
DIVERSITY
Summary We evaluated the presence of coronaviruses by PCR in 918 Australian wild bird samples collected during 2016-17. Coronaviruses were detected in 141 samples (15.3%) from species of ducks, shorebirds and herons and from multiple sampling locations. Sequencing of selected positive samples found mainly gammacoronaviruses, but also some deltacoronaviruses. The detection rate of coronaviruses was improved by using multiple PCR assays, as no single assay could detect all coronavirus positive samples. Sequencing of the relatively conserved Orf1 PCR amplicons found that Australian duck gammacoronaviruses were similar to duck gammacoronaviruses around the world. Some sequenced shorebird gammacoronaviruses belonged to Charadriiformes lineages, but others were more closely related to duck gammacoronaviruses. Australian duck and heron deltacoronaviruses belonged to lineages with other duck and heron deltacoronaviruses, but were almost 20% different in nucleotide sequence to other deltacoronavirus sequences available. Deltacoronavirus sequences from shorebirds formed a lineage with a deltacoronavirus from a ruddy turnstone detected in the United States. Given that Australian duck gammacoronaviruses are highly similar to those found in other regions, and Australian ducks rarely come into contact with migratory Palearctic duck species, we hypothesise that migratory shorebirds are the important vector for moving wild bird coronaviruses into and out of Australia.
Language eng
DOI 10.1038/s41598-018-24407-x
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2018, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30107873

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Life and Environmental Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.