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Effect of classroom-based physical activity interventions on academic and physical activity outcomes: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Watson, Amanda, Timperio, Anna, Brown, Helen, Best, Keren and Hesketh, Kylie 2017, Effect of classroom-based physical activity interventions on academic and physical activity outcomes: a systematic review and meta-analysis, International journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity, vol. 14, pp. 1-24, doi: 10.1186/s12966-017-0569-9.

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Title Effect of classroom-based physical activity interventions on academic and physical activity outcomes: a systematic review and meta-analysis
Author(s) Watson, Amanda
Timperio, AnnaORCID iD for Timperio, Anna orcid.org/0000-0002-8773-5012
Brown, HelenORCID iD for Brown, Helen orcid.org/0000-0002-5460-3654
Best, KerenORCID iD for Best, Keren orcid.org/0000-0002-7459-0862
Hesketh, KylieORCID iD for Hesketh, Kylie orcid.org/0000-0002-2702-7110
Journal name International journal of behavioral nutrition and physical activity
Volume number 14
Article ID 114
Start page 1
End page 24
Total pages 24
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2017-08-25
ISSN 1479-5868
Keyword(s) academic performance
children
classroom
intervention
meta-analysis
physical activity
schools
systematic review
academic success
child
cognition
curriculum
databases, factual
exercise
health behavior
learning
physical education and training
students
science & technology
life sciences & biomedicine
nutrition & dietetics
physiology
Summary BACKGROUND: Physical activity is associated with many physical and mental health benefits, however many children do not meet the national physical activity guidelines. While schools provide an ideal setting to promote children's physical activity, adding physical activity to the school day can be difficult given time constraints often imposed by competing key learning areas. Classroom-based physical activity may provide an opportunity to increase school-based physical activity while concurrently improving academic-related outcomes. The primary aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to evaluate the impact of classroom-based physical activity interventions on academic-related outcomes. A secondary aim was to evaluate the impact of these lessons on physical activity levels over the study duration. METHODS: A systematic search of electronic databases (PubMed, ERIC, SPORTDiscus, PsycINFO) was performed in January 2016 and updated in January 2017. Studies that investigated the association between classroom-based physical activity interventions and academic-related outcomes in primary (elementary) school-aged children were included. Meta-analyses were conducted in Review Manager, with effect sizes calculated separately for each outcome assessed. RESULTS: Thirty-nine articles met the inclusion criteria for the review, and 16 provided sufficient data and appropriate design for inclusion in the meta-analyses. Studies investigated a range of academic-related outcomes including classroom behaviour (e.g. on-task behaviour), cognitive functions (e.g. executive function), and academic achievement (e.g. standardised test scores). Results of the meta-analyses showed classroom-based physical activity had a positive effect on improving on-task and reducing off-task classroom behaviour (standardised mean difference = 0.60 (95% CI: 0.20,1.00)), and led to improvements in academic achievement when a progress monitoring tool was used (standardised mean difference = 1.03 (95% CI: 0.22,1.84)). However, no effect was found for cognitive functions (standardised mean difference = 0.33 (95% CI: -0.11,0.77)) or physical activity (standardised mean difference = 0.40 (95% CI: -1.15,0.95)). CONCLUSIONS: Results suggest classroom-based physical activity may have a positive impact on academic-related outcomes. However, it is not possible to draw definitive conclusions due to the level of heterogeneity in intervention components and academic-related outcomes assessed. Future studies should consider the intervention period when selecting academic-related outcome measures, and use an objective measure of physical activity to determine intervention fidelity and effects on overall physical activity levels.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12966-017-0569-9
Field of Research 11 Medical And Health Sciences
13 Education
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30107978

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.