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Reducing urinary catheter use: a protocol for a mixed methods evaluation of an electronic reminder system in hospitalised patients in Australia

Fasugba, Oyebola, Cheng, Allen C., Russo, Philip L., Northcote, Maria, Rosebrock, Hannah and Mitchell, Brett G. 2018, Reducing urinary catheter use: a protocol for a mixed methods evaluation of an electronic reminder system in hospitalised patients in Australia, BMJ Open, vol. 8, no. 5, doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-020469.

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Title Reducing urinary catheter use: a protocol for a mixed methods evaluation of an electronic reminder system in hospitalised patients in Australia
Author(s) Fasugba, Oyebola
Cheng, Allen C.
Russo, Philip L.ORCID iD for Russo, Philip L. orcid.org/0000-0003-3822-0554
Northcote, Maria
Rosebrock, Hannah
Mitchell, Brett G.
Journal name BMJ Open
Volume number 8
Issue number 5
Article ID e020469
Total pages 9
Publisher BMJ Publishing Group
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2018-05-10
ISSN 2044-6055
Keyword(s) cath tag
catheter-associated urinary tract infection
healthcare-associated infection
infection control
Summary Introduction Despite advances in infection prevention and control, catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) are common and remain problematic. Prolonged urinary catheterisation is the main risk factor for development of CAUTIs; hence, interventions that target early catheter removal warrant investigation. The study’s objectives are to examine the efficacy of an electronic reminder system, the CATH TAG, in reducing urinary catheter use (device utilisation ratio) and to determine the effect of the CATH TAG on nurses’ ability to deliver patient care.

Methods and analysis This study uses a mixed methods approach in which both quantitative and qualitative data will be collected. A stepped wedge randomised controlled design in which wards provide before and after observations will be undertaken in one large Australian hospital over 24 weeks. The intervention is the use of the CATH TAG. Eligible hospital wards will receive the intervention and act as their own control, with analysis undertaken of the change within each ward using data collected in control and intervention periods. An online survey will be administered to nurses on study completion, and a focus group for nurses will be conducted 2 months after study completion. The primary outcomes are the urinary catheter device utilisation ratio and perceptions of nurses about ease of use of the CATH TAG. Secondary outcomes include a reduced number of cases of catheter-associated asymptomatic bacteriuria, a reduced number of urinary catheters inserted per 100 patient admissions, perceptions of nurses regarding effectiveness of the CATH TAG, changes in ownership/interest by patients in catheter management, as well as possible barriers to successful implementation of the CATH TAG.

Ethics and dissemination Approval has been obtained from the Human Research Ethics Committees of Avondale College of Higher Education (2017:15) and Queensland Health (HREC17QTHS19). Results will be disseminated via peer-reviewed journals and conference presentations.
Language eng
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-020469
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2018, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution non-commercial licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30108262

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Nursing and Midwifery
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.