Variations in daily cigarette consumption on work days compared with nonwork days and associations with quitting: findings from the international tobacco control four-country survey

Cooper, Jae, Borland, Ron, Yong, Hua-Hie, Hyland, Andrew and Cummings, K Michael 2013, Variations in daily cigarette consumption on work days compared with nonwork days and associations with quitting: findings from the international tobacco control four-country survey, Nicotine and tobacco research, vol. 15, no. 1, pp. 192-198, doi: 10.1093/ntr/nts110.

Attached Files
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Title Variations in daily cigarette consumption on work days compared with nonwork days and associations with quitting: findings from the international tobacco control four-country survey
Author(s) Cooper, Jae
Borland, Ron
Yong, Hua-HieORCID iD for Yong, Hua-Hie orcid.org/0000-0001-8167-6173
Hyland, Andrew
Cummings, K Michael
Journal name Nicotine and tobacco research
Volume number 15
Issue number 1
Start page 192
End page 198
Total pages 7
Publisher Oxford Academic
Place of publication Oxford, Eng.
Publication date 2013-01-01
ISSN 1469-994X
Keyword(s) Australia
Canada
smoke
wave-physical agent
tobacco control
smoking
smoking cessation
tobacco products
tobacco use disorder
United Kingdom
United States
Summary INTRODUCTION: We explore whether reported daily cigarette consumption differs between work days and nonwork days and whether variation in consumption between work days and nonwork days influences quitting and abstinence from smoking. We also explore whether effects are independent of measures of addiction and smoking restrictions at work and home. METHODS: Data were from 5,732 respondents from the first five waves of the International Tobacco Control Four-Country Survey, occurring between 2002 and 2006. Respondents were current smokers employed outside the home. Variation in daily cigarette consumption on work days compared with nonwork days at one wave was used to predict the likelihood of making an attempt and the likelihood of maintaining a quit attempt for at least a month at the next wave. Generalized estimating equations were used to combine data for multiple waves. RESULTS: Just under half reported smoking more on a nonwork day, a little over a third reported no difference, and around one fifth reported smoking more on a work day. Controlling for possible confounding factors, smoking more on a work day was associated with making quit attempts. Among people who made a quit attempt, variation in consumption did not consistently predict one month's abstinence, being positive in Australia, but negative in the United Kingdom. CONCLUSION: Those who smoke more on work days try to quit more. Country differences for success may be related to the extent of bans on smoking, with those smoking more on work days more likely to succeed where bans in workplaces and public places were more prevalent, such as Australia at the time.
Language eng
DOI 10.1093/ntr/nts110
Field of Research 1117 Public Health And Health Services
1103 Clinical Sciences
1505 Marketing
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30108382

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Psychology
Connect to link resolver
 
Unless expressly stated otherwise, the copyright for items in DRO is owned by the author, with all rights reserved.

Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in TR Web of Science
Scopus Citation Count Cited 2 times in Scopus
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 214 Abstract Views, 2 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Tue, 15 May 2018, 15:04:30 EST

Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.