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Moonlighting proteins and their role in the control of signaling microenvironments, as exemplified by cGMP and phytosulfokine receptor 1 (PSKR1)

Irving, Helen R., Cahill, David M. and Gehring, Chris 2018, Moonlighting proteins and their role in the control of signaling microenvironments, as exemplified by cGMP and phytosulfokine receptor 1 (PSKR1), Frontiers in Plant Science, vol. 9, doi: 10.3389/fpls.2018.00415.

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Title Moonlighting proteins and their role in the control of signaling microenvironments, as exemplified by cGMP and phytosulfokine receptor 1 (PSKR1)
Author(s) Irving, Helen R.
Cahill, David M.ORCID iD for Cahill, David M. orcid.org/0000-0002-2556-0528
Gehring, Chris
Journal name Frontiers in Plant Science
Volume number 9
Article ID 415
Total pages 8
Publisher Frontiers Research Foundation
Place of publication Lausanne, Switzerland
Publication date 2018-03-28
ISSN 1664-462X
Keyword(s) calcium
cyclic nucleotides
cyclic GMP (cGMP)
kinases
intracellular signals
microenvironment
molecular crowding
phytosulfokine receptor (PSKR1)
Summary Signal generating and processing complexes and changes in concentrations of messenger molecules such as calcium ions and cyclic nucleotides develop gradients that have critical roles in relaying messages within cells. Cytoplasmic contents are densely packed, and in plant cells this is compounded by the restricted cytoplasmic space. To function in such crowded spaces, scaffold proteins have evolved to keep key enzymes in the correct place to ensure ordered spatial and temporal and stimulus-specific message generation. Hence, throughout the cytoplasm there are gradients of messenger molecules that influence signaling processes. However, it is only recently becoming apparent that specific complexes involving receptor molecules can generate multiple signal gradients and enriched microenvironments around the cytoplasmic domains of the receptor that regulate downstream signaling. Such gradients or signal circuits can involve moonlighting proteins, so called because they can enable fine-tune signal cascades via cryptic additional functions that are just being defined. This perspective focuses on how enigmatic activity of moonlighting proteins potentially contributes to regional intracellular microenvironments. For instance, the proteins associated with moonlighting proteins that generate cyclic nucleotides may be regulated by cyclic nucleotide binding directly or indirectly. In this perspective, we discuss how generation of cyclic nucleotide-enriched microenvironments can promote and regulate signaling events. As an example, we use the phytosulfokine receptor (PSKR1), discuss the function of its domains and their mutual interactions and argue that this complex architecture and function enhances tuning of signals in microenvironments.
Language eng
DOI 10.3389/fpls.2018.00415
Field of Research 060104 Cell Metabolism
060702 Plant Cell and Molecular Biology
060705 Plant Physiology
Socio Economic Objective 820299 Horticultural Crops not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2018, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30108469

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.