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Do self-reported stress and depressive symptoms effect endothelial function in healthy youth? The LOOK longitudinal study

Olive, Lisa S, Abhayaratna, Walter P, Byrne, Don, Richardson, Alice and Telford, Richard D 2018, Do self-reported stress and depressive symptoms effect endothelial function in healthy youth? The LOOK longitudinal study, PLoS one, vol. 13, no. 4, pp. 1-13, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0196137.

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Title Do self-reported stress and depressive symptoms effect endothelial function in healthy youth? The LOOK longitudinal study
Author(s) Olive, Lisa S
Abhayaratna, Walter P
Byrne, Don
Richardson, Alice
Telford, Richard D
Journal name PLoS one
Volume number 13
Issue number 4
Article ID e0196137
Start page 1
End page 13
Total pages 13
Publisher Public Library of Science
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2018-04-23
ISSN 1932-6203
Keyword(s) depression
psychological stress
children
psychological and psychosocial issues
cardiovascular disease
adolescents
psychometrics
mental health and psychiatry
Summary BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Endothelial dysfunction is thought to be an early indicator of risk for cardiovascular disease and has been associated with both stress and depression in adults and adolescents. Less is known of these relationships in younger populations, where the origins of CVD is thought to manifest. This study examined the effects of questionnaire derived psychosocial stress and depressive symptoms on endothelial function among children, following them through to adolescence.

METHOD: Participants were 203 grade 2 children (111 girls; M age = 7.6 ± 0.3 years) from the LOOK longitudinal study, who were followed through to adolescence (16 years). Self-reported psychosocial stress and depression were assessed using the validated Children's Stress Questionnaire and a modified and validated version of the Children's Depression Inventory respectively; endothelial function was assessed using EndoPAT 2000 system at follow-up only; and adjustments were made for fitness, pubertal development and socioeconomic status.

RESULTS: Although all relationships occurred in the hypothesised direction, no cross-sectional or prospective evidence of early symptoms of psychological stress or depression being associated with endothelial dysfunction was found among our asymptomatic cohort of adolescents (all p > .05).

CONCLUSIONS: In contrast to previous findings in adolescents, our data provided little evidence of any relationship between current or previous psychosocial stress or depression and endothelial function in 16-year-old boys and girls. However, our data need to be interpreted alongside the potential limitations in the sensitivity associated with self-report methods for detecting psychological distress of children.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0196137
Field of Research 170199 Psychology not elsewhere classified
MD Multidisciplinary
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2018, Olive et al.
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30108525

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.