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An investigation of cerebral oxygen utilization, blood flow and cognition in healthy aging

Catchlove, Sarah J, Macpherson, Helen, Hughes, Matthew E, Chen, Yufen, Parrish, Todd B and Pipingas, Andrew 2018, An investigation of cerebral oxygen utilization, blood flow and cognition in healthy aging, PLoS one, vol. 13, no. 5, pp. 1-21, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0197055.

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Title An investigation of cerebral oxygen utilization, blood flow and cognition in healthy aging
Author(s) Catchlove, Sarah J
Macpherson, HelenORCID iD for Macpherson, Helen orcid.org/0000-0002-3603-9359
Hughes, Matthew E
Chen, Yufen
Parrish, Todd B
Pipingas, Andrew
Journal name PLoS one
Volume number 13
Issue number 5
Article ID e0197055
Start page 1
End page 21
Total pages 21
Publisher Public Library of Science
Place of publication San Francisco, Calif.
Publication date 2018-05-22
ISSN 1932-6203
Keyword(s) vascular
metabolic factors
cognitive function
cerebral oxygen utilization
blood flow
cognition
healthy aging
cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen
CMRO2
cerebral blood flow
CBF
venous oxygenation
Yv
Summary BACKGROUND: Understanding how vascular and metabolic factors impact on cognitive function is essential to develop efficient therapies to prevent and treat cognitive losses in older age. Cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2), cerebral blood flow (CBF) and venous oxygenation (Yv) comprise key physiologic processes that maintain optimum functioning of neural activity. Changes to these parameters across the lifespan may precede neurodegeneration and contribute to age-related cognitive decline. This study examined differences in blood flow and metabolism between 31 healthy younger (<50 years) and 29 healthy older (>50 years) adults; and investigated whether these parameters contribute to cognitive performance.

METHOD: Participants underwent a cognitive assessment and MRI scan. Grey matter CMRO2 was calculated from measures of CBF (phase contrast MRI), arterial and venous oxygenation (TRUST MRI) to assess group differences in physiological function and the contribution of these parameters to cognition.

RESULTS: Performance on memory (p<0.001) and attention tasks (p<0.001) and total CBF were reduced (p<0.05), and Yv trended toward a decrease (p = .06) in the older group, while grey matter CBF and CMRO2 did not differ between the age groups. Attention was negatively associated with CBF when adjusted (p<0.05) in the older adults, but not in the younger group. There was no such relationship with memory. Neither cognitive measure was associated with oxygen metabolism or venous oxygenation in either age group.

CONCLUSION: Findings indicated an age-related imbalance between oxygen delivery, consumption and demand, evidenced by a decreased supply of oxygen with unchanged metabolism resulting in increased oxygen extraction. CBF predicted attention when the age-effect was controlled, suggesting a task- specific CBF- cognition relationship.
Language eng
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0197055
Field of Research 111603 Systems Physiology
MD Multidisciplinary
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2018, Catchlove et al
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30108561

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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.