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Efficacy of a telephone outcall program to reduce caregiver burden among caregivers of cancer patients [PROTECT]: a randomised controlled trial

Heckel, Leila, Fennell, Kate M., Reynolds, John, Boltong, Anna, Botti, Mari, Osborne, Richard H., Mihalopoulos, Cathrine, Chirgwin, Jacqui, Williams, Melinda, Gaskin, Cadeyrn J., Ashley, David M. and Livingston, Patricia M. 2018, Efficacy of a telephone outcall program to reduce caregiver burden among caregivers of cancer patients [PROTECT]: a randomised controlled trial, BMC cancer, vol. 18, pp. 1-13, doi: 10.1186/s12885-017-3961-6.

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Title Efficacy of a telephone outcall program to reduce caregiver burden among caregivers of cancer patients [PROTECT]: a randomised controlled trial
Author(s) Heckel, LeilaORCID iD for Heckel, Leila orcid.org/0000-0002-9138-1034
Fennell, Kate M.
Reynolds, John
Boltong, Anna
Botti, MariORCID iD for Botti, Mari orcid.org/0000-0002-2782-0987
Osborne, Richard H.ORCID iD for Osborne, Richard H. orcid.org/0000-0002-9081-2699
Mihalopoulos, CathrineORCID iD for Mihalopoulos, Cathrine orcid.org/0000-0002-7127-9462
Chirgwin, Jacqui
Williams, Melinda
Gaskin, Cadeyrn J.ORCID iD for Gaskin, Cadeyrn J. orcid.org/0000-0001-5240-4320
Ashley, David M.
Livingston, Patricia M.ORCID iD for Livingston, Patricia M. orcid.org/0000-0001-6616-3839
Journal name BMC cancer
Volume number 18
Article ID 59
Start page 1
End page 13
Total pages 13
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2018-01
ISSN 1471-2407
Keyword(s) Cancer
Caregiver burden
Caregivers
Depression
Health literacy
Helpline
RCT
Support
Telephone intervention
Unmet needs
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Oncology
Supportive care needs
Family careginvers
Clinical trial
Breast-cancer
Interventions
Partners
People
Metaanalysis
Summary BACKGROUND: Informal caregivers provide extended support to people with cancer but they receive little support from the health care system to assist them in their caring role. The aim of this single-blind, multi-centre, randomised controlled trial was to test the efficacy of a telephone outcall program to reduce caregiver burden and unmet needs, and improve psychological well-being among cancer caregivers, as well as evaluating the potential impact on patient outcomes.

METHODS: Cancer patient/caregiver dyads (N = 216) were randomised to a telephone outcall program (n = 108) or attention control group (n = 108). The primary outcome was self-reported caregiver burden. Secondary endpoints included depressive symptoms, unmet needs, self-esteem, self-empowerment, and health literacy. Data were collected at baseline and at both 1 and 6 months post-intervention. An intention to treat analysis was performed.

RESULTS: The intervention had no effect on the primary outcome (caregiver burden), but reduced the number of caregiver unmet needs (intervention group baseline, mean = 2.66, 95% confidence interval (CI) [1.91-3.54]; intervention group 1 month post intervention, mean = 0.85, 95%CI [0.42-1.44]; control group baseline, mean = 1.30 95%CI [0.80-1.94], control group 1 month post intervention, mean = 1.02 95%CI [0.52-1.69]; p = 0.023). For caregivers at risk for depression, the intervention had a significant effect on caregivers' confidence in having sufficient information to manage their health (p = 0.040). No effects were found for patients' depressive symptoms, unmet needs, self-empowerment, and other health literacy domains.

CONCLUSIONS: While caregiver burden was not reduced, the outcall program was effective in reducing unmet needs in caregivers. Provision of cancer information and support via a telephone service may represent a feasible approach to reducing unmet needs among cancer caregiver populations.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12885-017-3961-6
Field of Research 111714 Mental Health
140208 Health Economics
1112 Oncology And Carcinogenesis
Socio Economic Objective 920410 Mental Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2018, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30108566

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Centre for Quality and Patient Safety Research
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.