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Does safe disposal of child faeces matter? An assessment of access to improved sanitation and child faeces disposal behaviour and diarrhoea in rural Nepal

Lamichhane, Prabhat, Sharma, Anurag and Mahal, Ajay 2018, Does safe disposal of child faeces matter? An assessment of access to improved sanitation and child faeces disposal behaviour and diarrhoea in rural Nepal, International health, vol. 10, no. 4, pp. 277-284, doi: 10.1093/inthealth/ihy030.

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Title Does safe disposal of child faeces matter? An assessment of access to improved sanitation and child faeces disposal behaviour and diarrhoea in rural Nepal
Author(s) Lamichhane, PrabhatORCID iD for Lamichhane, Prabhat orcid.org/0000-0002-5719-7129
Sharma, Anurag
Mahal, Ajay
Journal name International health
Volume number 10
Issue number 4
Start page 277
End page 284
Total pages 8
Publisher Oxford University Press
Place of publication Oxford, Eng.
Publication date 2018-07-01
ISSN 1876-3405
Keyword(s) child faeces
diarrhoea
impact evaluation
Nepal
sanitation
science & technology
life sciences & biomedicine
public, environmental & occupational health
Summary Background: Improper disposal of child faeces is a major source of faecal pathogens that cause diarrhoeal disease. However, this has received relatively less attention in sanitation evaluation literature, which has tended to focus on sanitation provision, implicitly assuming that child faeces disposal behaviour also improves with sanitation. We examined the impact of improved sanitation without safe disposal (households with improved sanitation but not disposing of child faeces in improved sanitation) and improved sanitation with safe disposal (households with improved sanitation and disposal of child faeces in improved sanitation) on diarrhoeal prevalence in rural Nepal. Methods: Data from the Nepal Demographic Health Survey 2011 for 3377 children <5 y of age were used to answer the research question using quasi-experimental methods. Results: Improved sanitation with safe disposal was associated with a 3.3 percentage point (standard error [SE] 0.016) to 6.6 percentage point (SE 0.023) lower prevalence of diarrhoea among children <5 y of age compared with matched households without access to improved sanitation. No effect was observed for households having improved sanitation without safe disposal compared with matched households without access to improved sanitation. Improved sanitation with safe disposal was also associated with a 4.0 percentage point (SE 0.023) lower prevalence of diarrhoea in low economic status households (bottom two quintiles). Conclusions: Our results suggest that sanitation programmes need to focus on behavioural interventions as well as increasing access to sanitation facilities.
Language eng
DOI 10.1093/inthealth/ihy030
Field of Research 11 Medical And Health Sciences
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
Copyright notice ©2018, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30108629

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Faculty of Health
School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.