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Conceptualisation and development of the Conversational Health Literacy Assessment Tool (CHAT)

O'Hara, Jonathan, Hawkins, Melanie, Batterham, Roy, Dodson, Sarity, Osborne, Richard H. and Beauchamp, Alison 2018, Conceptualisation and development of the Conversational Health Literacy Assessment Tool (CHAT), BMC health services research, vol. 18, no. 1, pp. 1-8, doi: 10.1186/s12913-018-3037-6.

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Title Conceptualisation and development of the Conversational Health Literacy Assessment Tool (CHAT)
Author(s) O'Hara, Jonathan
Hawkins, MelanieORCID iD for Hawkins, Melanie orcid.org/0000-0001-5704-0490
Batterham, RoyORCID iD for Batterham, Roy orcid.org/0000-0002-5273-1011
Dodson, Sarity
Osborne, Richard H.ORCID iD for Osborne, Richard H. orcid.org/0000-0002-9081-2699
Beauchamp, AlisonORCID iD for Beauchamp, Alison orcid.org/0000-0001-6555-6200
Journal name BMC health services research
Volume number 18
Issue number 1
Article ID 199
Start page 1
End page 8
Total pages 8
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2018-03-22
ISSN 1472-6963
Keyword(s) CHAT
Clinical assessment
Conversational health literacy assessment tool
HLQ
Health literacy
Patient-centred care
Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Health Care Sciences & Services
QUESTIONNAIRE HLQ
CARE
COMMUNICATION
Health Literacy Questionnaire
Summary Background
The aim of this study was to develop a tool to support health workers’ ability to identify patients’ multidimensional health literacy strengths and challenges. The tool was intended to be suitable for administration in healthcare settings where health workers must identify health literacy priorities as the basis for person-centred care.

Methods
Development was based on a qualitative co-design process that used the Health Literacy Questionnaire (HLQ) as a framework to generate questions. Health workers were recruited to participate in an online consultation, a workshop, and two rounds of pilot testing.

Results
Participating health workers identified and refined ten questions that target five areas of assessment: supportive professional relationships, supportive personal relationships, health information access and comprehension, current health behaviours, and health promotion barriers and support.

Conclusions
Preliminary evidence suggests that application of the Conversational Health Literacy Assessment Tool (CHAT) can support health workers to better understand the health literacy challenges and supportive resources of their patients. As an integrated clinical process, the CHAT can supplement existing intake and assessment procedures across healthcare settings to give insight into patients’ circumstances so that decisions about care can be tailored to be more appropriate and effective.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12913-018-3037-6
Field of Research 111708 Health and Community Services
111712 Health Promotion
111710 Health Counselling
1117 Public Health And Health Services
Socio Economic Objective 920206 Health Inequalities
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2018, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30108682

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Health and Social Development
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.