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Chronic ketogenic low carbohydrate high fat diet has minimal effects on acid–base status in elite athletes

Carr, Amelia J, Sharma, Avish P, Ross, Megan L, Welvaert, Marijke, Slater, Gary J and Burke, Louise M 2018, Chronic ketogenic low carbohydrate high fat diet has minimal effects on acid–base status in elite athletes, Nutrients, vol. 10, no. 2, pp. 1-13, doi: 10.3390/nu10020236.

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Title Chronic ketogenic low carbohydrate high fat diet has minimal effects on acid–base status in elite athletes
Author(s) Carr, Amelia JORCID iD for Carr, Amelia J orcid.org/0000-0003-3855-2540
Sharma, Avish P
Ross, Megan L
Welvaert, Marijke
Slater, Gary J
Burke, Louise M
Journal name Nutrients
Volume number 10
Issue number 2
Article ID 236
Start page 1
End page 13
Total pages 13
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2018
ISSN 2072-6643
Keyword(s) dietary interventions
periodized carbohydrate diet
fat adaptation
keto-adaptation
Summary Although short (up to 3 days) exposure to major shifts in macronutrient intake appears to alter acid–base status, the effects of sustained (>1 week) interventions in elite athletes has not been determined. Using a non-randomized, parallel design, we examined the effect of adaptations to 21 days of a ketogenic low carbohydrate high fat (LCHF) or periodized carbohydrate (PCHO) diet on pre- and post-exercise blood pH, and concentrations of bicarbonate [HCO3−] and lactate [La−] in comparison to a high carbohydrate (HCHO) control. Twenty-four (17 male and 7 female) elite-level race walkers completed 21 days of either LCHF (n = 9), PCHO (n = 7), or HCHO (n = 8) under controlled diet and training conditions. At baseline and post-intervention, blood pH, blood [HCO3−], and blood [La−] were measured before and after a graded exercise test. Net endogenous acid production (NEAP) over the previous 48–72 h was also calculated from monitored dietary intake. LCHF was not associated with significant differences in blood pH, [HCO3−], or [La−], compared with the HCHO diet pre- or post-exercise, despite a significantly higher NEAP (mEq·day−1) (95% CI = (10.44; 36.04)). Our results indicate that chronic dietary interventions are unlikely to influence acid–base status in elite athletes, which may be due to pre-existing training adaptations, such as an enhanced buffering capacity, or the actions of respiratory and renal pathways, which have a greater influence on regulation of acid–base status than nutritional intake.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/nu10020236
Field of Research 1111 Nutrition And Dietetics
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2018, the authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30108729

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.