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What do children observe and learn from televised sports betting advertisements? A qualitative study among Australian children

Pitt, Hannah, Thomas, Samantha L, Bestman, Amy, Daube, Mike and Derevensky, Jeffrey 2017, What do children observe and learn from televised sports betting advertisements? A qualitative study among Australian children, Australian and New Zealand journal of public health, vol. 41, no. 6, pp. 604-610, doi: 10.1111/1753-6405.12728.

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Title What do children observe and learn from televised sports betting advertisements? A qualitative study among Australian children
Author(s) Pitt, HannahORCID iD for Pitt, Hannah orcid.org/0000-0002-4259-6186
Thomas, Samantha LORCID iD for Thomas, Samantha L orcid.org/0000-0003-1427-7775
Bestman, AmyORCID iD for Bestman, Amy orcid.org/0000-0003-1269-2123
Daube, Mike
Derevensky, Jeffrey
Journal name Australian and New Zealand journal of public health
Volume number 41
Issue number 6
Start page 604
End page 610
Total pages 7
Publisher John Wiley & Sons
Place of publication Chichester, Eng.
Publication date 2017-12
ISSN 1753-6405
Keyword(s) advertising
children
gambling
sports betting
science & technology
life sciences & biomedicine
public, environmental & occupational health
Summary Objective: To explore children's awareness of sports betting advertising and how this advertising may influence children's attitudes, product knowledge and desire to try sports betting.

Methods:
Semi‐structured qualitative interviews were conducted with 48 children (8–16 years) from Melbourne, Victoria. The interview schedule explored children's recall and interpretations of sports betting advertising, strategies within advertisements that may appeal to children, children's product knowledge and understanding of betting terminology, and factors that may encourage gambling. Interviews were transcribed and thematic analysis was conducted.

Results: Children recalled in detail sports betting advertisements that they had seen, with humour the most engaging appeal strategy. They were also able to describe other specific appeal strategies and link these strategies to betting brands. Many children described how advertisements demonstrated how someone would place a bet, with some children recalling the detailed technical language associated with betting.

Conclusions: Children had detailed recall of sports betting advertisements and an extensive knowledge of sports betting products and terminology.

Implications for public health: To protect children from the potential harms associated with sports betting, governments should consider changing regulations and implementing evidence‐based education campaigns to counter the positive messages children receive from the sports betting industry.
Language eng
DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12728
Field of Research 1117 Public Health And Health Services
1402 Applied Economics
1605 Policy And Administration
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No-Derivatives licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30108731

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: Population Health
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.