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Assisting an Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander person with gambling problems: a Delphi study

Bond, Kathy S, Dart, Katrina M, Jorm, Anthony F, Kelly, Claire M, Kitchener, Betty A and Reavley, Nicola J 2017, Assisting an Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander person with gambling problems: a Delphi study, BMC psychology, vol. 5, pp. 1-8, doi: 10.1186/s40359-017-0196-x.

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Title Assisting an Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander person with gambling problems: a Delphi study
Author(s) Bond, Kathy S
Dart, Katrina M
Jorm, Anthony F
Kelly, Claire M
Kitchener, Betty A
Reavley, Nicola J
Journal name BMC psychology
Volume number 5
Article ID 27
Start page 1
End page 8
Total pages 8
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2017-08-02
ISSN 2050-7283
2050-7283
Keyword(s) aboriginal
gambling problems
how to assist
mental health first aid
Torres Strait Islander
Australia
Delphi technique
female
gambling
guidelines as Topic
male
middle aged
oceanic ancestry group
surveys and questionnaires
Summary BACKGROUND: Gambling problems appear to be more prevalent in the Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population than in the non-Indigenous population. Although gambling harms can be significant, treatment-seeking rates are low. The Delphi expert consensus method was used to develop a set of guidelines on how a family or community member can assist an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander person with gambling problems.

METHODS: Building on a previous systematic review of websites, books and journal articles a questionnaire was developed that contained items about the knowledge, skills and actions needed for supporting an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander person with gambling problems. These items were rated over three rounds by an expert panel comprising professionals who provide treatment to or conduct research with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people with gambling problems.

RESULTS: A total of 22 experts rated 407 helping statements according to whether they thought the statements should be included in these guidelines. There were 225 helping statements that were endorsed by at least 90% of participants. These endorsed statements were used to develop the guidelines.

CONCLUSION: Experts were able to reach substantial consensus on how someone can recognise the signs of gambling problems and support an Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander person to change.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s40359-017-0196-x
Field of Research 170199 Psychology not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30108769

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Psychology
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.