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Cigarette smoking is associated with an altered vaginal tract metabolomic profile

Nelson, TM, Borgogna, JC, Michalek, RD, Roberts, DW, Rath, JM, Glover, ED, Ravel, J, Shardell, MD, Yeoman, CJ and Brotman, RM 2018, Cigarette smoking is associated with an altered vaginal tract metabolomic profile, Scientific reports, vol. 8, no. 1, doi: 10.1038/s41598-017-14943-3.

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Title Cigarette smoking is associated with an altered vaginal tract metabolomic profile
Author(s) Nelson, TMORCID iD for Nelson, TM orcid.org/0000-0002-5341-312X
Borgogna, JC
Michalek, RD
Roberts, DW
Rath, JM
Glover, ED
Ravel, J
Shardell, MD
Yeoman, CJ
Brotman, RM
Journal name Scientific reports
Volume number 8
Issue number 1
Article ID 852
Total pages 13
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2018-01-16
ISSN 2045-2322
2045-2322
Keyword(s) science & technology
risk factors
sexually transmitted disease
simplex virus type 2
tobacco smokle
cigarette smoking
altered vaginal tract
bacterial vaginosis (BV)
vaginal microbiota
Lactobacillus spp.
Summary Cigarette smoking has been associated with both the diagnosis of bacterial vaginosis (BV) and a vaginal microbiota lacking protective Lactobacillus spp. As the mechanism linking smoking with vaginal microbiota and BV is unclear, we sought to compare the vaginal metabolomes of smokers and non-smokers (17 smokers/19 non-smokers). Metabolomic profiles were determined by gas and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry in a cross-sectional study. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene populations revealed samples clustered into three community state types (CSTs) ---- CST-I (L. crispatus-dominated), CST-III (L. iners-dominated) or CST-IV (low-Lactobacillus). We identified 607 metabolites, including 12 that differed significantly (q-value < 0.05) between smokers and non-smokers. Nicotine, and the breakdown metabolites cotinine and hydroxycotinine were substantially higher in smokers, as expected. Among women categorized to CST-IV, biogenic amines, including agmatine, cadaverine, putrescine, tryptamine and tyramine were substantially higher in smokers, while dipeptides were lower in smokers. These biogenic amines are known to affect the virulence of infective pathogens and contribute to vaginal malodor. Our data suggest that cigarette smoking is associated with differences in important vaginal metabolites, and women who smoke, and particularly women who are also depauperate for Lactobacillus spp., may have increased susceptibilities to urogenital infections and increased malodor.
Language eng
DOI 10.1038/s41598-017-14943-3
Field of Research 110899 Medical Microbiology not elsewhere classified
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2018, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30108791

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.