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Efficacy and effectiveness of carnitine supplementation for cancer-related fatigue: a systematic literature review and meta-analysis

Marx, Wolfgang, Teleni, Laisa, Opie, Rachelle S, Kelly, Jaimon, Marshall, Skye, Itsiopoulos, Catherine and Isenring, Elizabeth 2017, Efficacy and effectiveness of carnitine supplementation for cancer-related fatigue: a systematic literature review and meta-analysis, Nutrients, vol. 9, no. 11, doi: 10.3390/nu9111224.

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Title Efficacy and effectiveness of carnitine supplementation for cancer-related fatigue: a systematic literature review and meta-analysis
Author(s) Marx, WolfgangORCID iD for Marx, Wolfgang orcid.org/0000-0002-8556-8230
Teleni, Laisa
Opie, Rachelle S
Kelly, Jaimon
Marshall, Skye
Itsiopoulos, Catherine
Isenring, Elizabeth
Journal name Nutrients
Volume number 9
Issue number 11
Total pages 24
Publisher MDPI
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publication date 2017-11-01
ISSN 2072-6643
Keyword(s) carnitine
fatigue
cancer
dietary supplement
systematic review
science & technology
life sciences & biomedicine
nutrition & dietetics
Summary Background: Carnitine deficiency has been implicated as a potential pathway for cancer-related fatigue that could be treated with carnitine supplementation. The aim of this systematic literature review and meta-analysis was to evaluate the literature regarding the use of supplemental carnitine as a tre atment for cancer-related fatigue.

Methods: Using the PRISMA guidelines, an electronic search of the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL and reference lists was conducted. Data were extracted and independently assessed for quality using the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics evidence analysis by two reviewers. In studies with positive quality ratings, a meta-analysis was performed using the random-effects model on Carnitine and cancer-related fatigue.

Results: Twelve studies were included for review with eight reporting improvement in measures of fatigue, while four reported no benefit. However, many studies were non-randomized, open-label and/or used inappropriate dose or comparators. Meta-analysis was performed in three studies with sufficient data. Carnitine did not significantly reduce cancer-related fatigue with a standardized mean difference (SMD) of 0.06 points ((95% CI −0.09, 0.21); p = 0.45).

Conclusion:
Results from studies with lower risk of bias do not support the use of carnitine supplementation for cancer-related fatigue.
Language eng
DOI 10.3390/nu9111224
Field of Research 1111 Nutrition And Dietetics
HERDC Research category C1.1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30108808

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.