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Cognitive functioning following stabilisation from first episode mania

Daglas, Rothanthi, Allott, Kelly, Yücel, Murat, Henry, Lisa P., Macneil, Craig A., Hasty, Melissa K, Berk, Michael and Cotton, Sue M. 2017, Cognitive functioning following stabilisation from first episode mania, International journal of bipolar disorders, vol. 5, no. 1, pp. 1-11, doi: 10.1186/s40345-017-0108-2.

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Title Cognitive functioning following stabilisation from first episode mania
Author(s) Daglas, Rothanthi
Allott, Kelly
Yücel, Murat
Henry, Lisa P.
Macneil, Craig A.
Hasty, Melissa K
Berk, MichaelORCID iD for Berk, Michael orcid.org/0000-0002-5554-6946
Cotton, Sue M.
Journal name International journal of bipolar disorders
Volume number 5
Issue number 1
Article ID 39
Start page 1
End page 11
Total pages 11
Publisher Springer
Place of publication Berlin, Germany
Publication date 2017-12-18
ISSN 2194-7511
Keyword(s) Bipolar disorder
Cognition
Depression
Manic
Remission
Summary Background
The purpose of this study was to examine cognitive functioning in people following first-episode mania relative to a demographically similar healthy control group.

Methods
Forty-one patients, who had recently stabilised from a first manic episode, and twenty-one healthy controls, were compared in an extensive cognitive assessment.

Results

First-episode mania participants had significantly lower Full-Scale IQ (FSIQ) relative to healthy controls; however, this finding could be driven by premorbid differences in intellectual functioning. There were no significant differences between groups in Verbal IQ (VIQ) and Performance IQ (PIQ). First-episode mania participants performed significantly poorer than healthy controls in processing speed, verbal learning and memory, working memory, and cognitive flexibility with medium-to-large effects. There were no group differences in other measures of cognition.

Conclusions
Participants following first-episode mania have poorer global intelligence than healthy controls, and have cognitive difficulties in some, but not all areas of cognitive functioning. This highlights the importance of early intervention and cognitive assessment in the early course of the disorder.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s40345-017-0108-2
Field of Research 110399 Clinical Sciences not elsewhere classified
Socio Economic Objective 920410 Mental Health
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30108893

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Medicine
Open Access Collection
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.