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Proportion of infants meeting the Australian 24-hour movement guidelines for the early years: data from the Melbourne InFANT Program

Hesketh, Kylie D, Downing, Katherine L, Campbell, Karen, Crawford, David, Salmon, Jo and Hnatiuk, Jill A 2017, Proportion of infants meeting the Australian 24-hour movement guidelines for the early years: data from the Melbourne InFANT Program, BMC public health, vol. 17, no. Suppl 5, pp. 191-198, doi: 10.1186/s12889-017-4856-9.

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Title Proportion of infants meeting the Australian 24-hour movement guidelines for the early years: data from the Melbourne InFANT Program
Author(s) Hesketh, Kylie DORCID iD for Hesketh, Kylie D orcid.org/0000-0002-2702-7110
Downing, Katherine LORCID iD for Downing, Katherine L orcid.org/0000-0002-6552-8506
Campbell, KarenORCID iD for Campbell, Karen orcid.org/0000-0002-4499-3396
Crawford, DavidORCID iD for Crawford, David orcid.org/0000-0002-2467-7556
Salmon, JoORCID iD for Salmon, Jo orcid.org/0000-0002-4734-6354
Hnatiuk, Jill AORCID iD for Hnatiuk, Jill A orcid.org/0000-0002-5754-7176
Journal name BMC public health
Volume number 17
Issue number Suppl 5
Article ID 856
Start page 191
End page 198
Total pages 8
Publisher BioMed Central
Place of publication London, Eng.
Publication date 2017-11-20
ISSN 1471-2458
Keyword(s) early childhood
movement guidelines
physical activity
sedentary behaviour
sleep
Australia
exercise
female
guideline adherence
guidelines as topic
infant
infant behavior
infant, newborn
male
sedentary lifestyle
time factors
science & technology
life sciences & biomedicine
public, environmental & occupational health
Summary BACKGROUND: Little information is available on the movement behaviours of infants, despite evidence that these are important for development. The release of new Australian 24-hour Movement Guidelines provides an opportunity to document the current state of movement behaviours in infants relative to these guidelines. The aim of this study was to report the prevalence of 4 month old Australian infants meeting the 24-hour Movement Guidelines, individually, and in combination, and to describe associations with individual characteristics.

METHODS: Maternal report baseline data from the Melbourne Infant Feeding, Activity and Nutrition Trial Program were used to determine prevalence of infants meeting physical activity (30 min of tummy time per day), sedentary behaviour (no more than 1 h at a time kept restrained; zero screen time), and sleep guidelines (14-17 h for 0-3 month olds or 12-16 h for 4-11 month olds). Prevalence of infants meeting combined guidelines was also described. The odds of meeting guidelines based on infant and family characteristics was determined.

RESULTS: Data are reported for 455 infants with a mean age of 3.6 months (SD = 1.0). The proportion of infants meeting each of the guidelines was 29.7% for tummy time, 56.9% for kept restrained, 27.9% for screen time, 58.7% for sleep and 3.5% for the combined guidelines (i.e. meeting all four guidelines). A significantly higher proportion of girls than boys met the screen time guideline (32.5% versus 24.0%, p = 0.04) and the combined guidelines (5.7% versus 1.6%, p = 0.01). Few associations were observed between infant and family characteristics and proportion of infants meeting individual guidelines.

CONCLUSIONS: Very few infants met all of the guidelines contained in the new Australian 24-hour Movement Guidelines suggesting there is much room for improvement in movement behaviours from early life. Fewer infants met the tummy time and screen time guidelines hence these appear to be the behaviours requiring most attention. Parents and others providing care to infants require support and strategies to assist them in adhering to the guidelines to ensure optimal health and development for the youngest in our population.
Language eng
DOI 10.1186/s12889-017-4856-9
Field of Research 1117 Public Health And Health Services
HERDC Research category C1 Refereed article in a scholarly journal
ERA Research output type C Journal article
Copyright notice ©2017, The Authors
Free to Read? Yes
Use Rights Creative Commons Attribution licence
Persistent URL http://hdl.handle.net/10536/DRO/DU:30108987

Document type: Journal Article
Collections: School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences
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Every reasonable effort has been made to ensure that permission has been obtained for items included in DRO. If you believe that your rights have been infringed by this repository, please contact drosupport@deakin.edu.au.